Etymology
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Calais 
city on the French coast of the English Channel, from Gaulish Caleti, the name of a Celtic people who once lived along the shore there.
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Biscay 
historically Basque region of northern Spain (Spanish Vizcaya), along the bay named for it between Spain and France, said to be from Basque biskar "mountain country." Related: Biscayan.
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Mojave 

Native American people of Yuman stock living along the Colorado River, also Mohave, 1831, from native (Yuman) name, hamakhaav, perhaps containing aha "water."

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Como 
lake in Italy, named for the town along its shore, which is Roman Comum, from Celtic cumba "valley" (compare coomb). Its ancient name was Lacus Larius; Lacus Comacinus begins to appear 4c. It is associated with Virgil and the two Plinys.
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Susquehanna 
river through Pennsylvania, named for a native people who lived along the southern reaches of it at the time of European contact, "An Algonquian name for an Iroquoian people; it has been translated as 'people at the falls' or 'roily water people'" [Bright].
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Europe 

from Latin Europa "Europe," from Greek Europe, which is of uncertain origin; as a geographic name first recorded in the Homeric hymn to Apollo (522 B.C.E. or earlier):

"Telphusa, here I am minded to make a glorious temple, an oracle for men, and hither they will always bring perfect hecatombs, both those who live in rich Peloponnesus and those of Europe and all the wave-washed isles, coming to seek oracles."

Often explained as "broad face," from eurys "wide" (see eury-) + ops "face," literally "eye" (from PIE root *okw- "to see"). But also traditionally linked with Europa, Phoenician princess in Greek mythology. Klein (citing Heinrich Lewy) suggests a possible Semitic origin in Akkad. erebu "to go down, set" (in reference to the sun) which would parallel occident. Another suggestion along those lines is Phoenician 'ereb "evening," hence "west."

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Sicily 
island off the southwest tip of Italy, from Latin Sicilia, from Greek Sikelia, from Sikeloi (plural) "Sicilians," from the name of an ancient people living along the Tiber, whence part of them emigrated to the island that was thereafter named for them. The Greeks distinguished Sikeliotes "a Greek colonist in Sicily" from Sikelos "a native Sicilian." Related: Sicilian.
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Scythian (n.)

one of an ancient nomadic race living on the steppes of southern Russia, 1540s, from Latin Scythia, from Greek Skythia, name anciently given to the region along the north coast of the Black Sea and extending in definitely north, from Skythes "a Scythian," said to be from an Indo-European root meaning "shepherd" [Room]. The earlier noun was Scyth (late 14c.). As an adjective from 1560s, "pertaining to Scythia or the Scythians." Herodotus is responsible for Scythian disease or Scythian insanity.

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Arizona 
1861, originally as the name of a breakaway Confederate region of southern New Mexico; organized roughly along modern lines as a U.S. territory in 1863, admitted as a state 1912. From Spanish Arizonac, which is probably from a local name among the O'odham (Piman) people meaning "having a little spring." Alternative theory is that it derives from Basque arizonak "good oaks."
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Humphrey 
masc. proper name, from Old English Hunfrið, probably from Proto-Germanic *hun "strength" + Old English frið "peace." To dine with Duke Humphrey (17c.) meant to go without a meal, though the reason for the expression now is obscure.
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