Etymology
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glottis (n.)

"mouth of the windpipe, opening at the top of the larynx," 1570s, from Greek glōttis "mouthpiece of a pipe," from glōtta, Attic dialect variant of glōssa "tongue" (see gloss (n.2)).

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glottal (adj.)
1846, "pertaining to or formed by the glottis;" see glottis + -al (1). Glossal is attested from 1860.
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epiglottis (n.)

1610s, from Late Latin epiglottis, from Greek epiglottis, literally "(that which is) upon the tongue," from epi "on" (see epi-) + glōttis, from glōtta, variant of glōssa "tongue" (see gloss (n.2)). An earlier form was epiglote (early 15c.), from Old French epiglotte. Related: Epiglottic.

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croup (n.)

"coughing illness," a name given to various diseases involving interference at the glottis with respiration," 1765, from obsolete verb croup "to cry hoarsely, croak" (1510s), probably echoic. This was the local name of the disease in southeastern Scotland, given wide currency by Dr. Francis Home (1719-1813) of Edinburgh in his 1765 treatise on it. Related: Croupy.

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