Etymology
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global (adj.)

1670s, "spherical," from globe + -al (1). Meaning "worldwide, universal, pertaining to the whole globe of the earth" is from 1892, from a sense development in French. Global village first attested 1960, popularized, if not coined, by Canadian educator Marshall McLuhan (1911-1980).

Postliterate man's electronic media contract the world to a village or tribe where everything happens to everyone at the same time: everyone knows about, and therefore participates in, everything that is happening the minute it happens. Television gives this quality of simultaneity to events in the global village. [Carpenter & McLuhan, "Explorations in Communication," 1960]
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globalize (v.)
from 1953 in various senses; the main modern one, with reference to global economic systems, emerged 1959. See global + -ize. Related: Globalized; globalizing.
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globally (adv.)
"throughout the whole world," by 1910, from global + -ly (2).
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globalism (n.)

used from c. 1946 in a variety of senses, both by those supporting and those opposed to whatever it was: American intervention in foreign conflicts, a global foreign policy; supremacy of global institutions over national ones; a worldwide extension of capitalist market systems; from global + -ism. Related: Globalist.

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global warming (n.)
by 1983 as the name for a condition of overall rising temperatures on Earth and attendant consequences as a result of human activity. Originally theoretical, popularized as a reality from 1989.
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escalation (n.)
1938, derived noun from escalate; the figurative sense is earliest, originally in reference to the battleship arms race among global military powers.
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climate change (n.)

1983, in the modern "human-caused global warming" sense. See climate (n.) + change (n.). Climatic change in a similar sense was in use from 1975.

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Beatles (n.)
seminal rock and pop group formed in Liverpool, England; named as such 1960 (after a succession of other names), supposedly by then-bassist Stuart Sutcliffe, from beetles (on model of Buddy Holly's band The Crickets) with a pun on the musical sense of beat. Their global popularity dates to 1963.
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globalisation (n.)
chiefly British English spelling of globalization; for spelling, see -ize.
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