Etymology
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*ghel- (2)

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to shine;" it forms words for "gold" (the "bright" metal), words denoting colors, especially "yellow" and "green," also "bile, gall," for its color, and a large group of Germanic gl- words having to do with shining and glittering and, perhaps, sliding. Buck says the interchange of words for yellow and green is "perhaps because they were applied to vegetation like grass, cereals, etc., which changed from green to yellow."

It forms all or part of: arsenic; Chloe; chloral; chloride; chlorinate; chlorine; chloro-; chloroform; chlorophyll; chloroplast; cholecyst; choler; cholera; choleric; cholesterol; cholinergic; Cloris; gall (n.1) "bile, liver secretion;" gild; glad; glance; glare; glass; glaze; glazier; gleam; glee; glib; glide; glimmer; glimpse; glint; glissade; glisten; glister; glitch; glitter; glitzy; gloaming; gloat; gloss (n.1) "glistening smoothness, luster;" glow; glower; gold; guilder; jaundice; melancholic; melancholy; yellow; zloty.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit harih "yellow, tawny yellow," hiranyam "gold;" Avestan zari "yellow;" Old Persian daraniya-, Avestan zaranya- "gold;"  Greek khlōros "greenish-yellow color,"  kholos "bile, gall, wrath;"  Latin helvus "yellowish, bay," Gallo-Latin gilvus "light bay;" Lithuanian geltonas "yellow;" Old Church Slavonic zlutu, Polish żółty, Russian zeltyj "yellow;" Latin galbus "greenish-yellow," fellis "bile, gall;" Lithuanian žalias "green," želvas "greenish," tulžis "bile;" Old Church Slavonic zelenu, Polish zielony, Russian zelenyj "green;" Old Irish glass, Welsh and Breton glas "green," also "gray, blue;" Old English galla "gall, bile," geolu, geolwe, German gelb, Old Norse gulr "yellow;" Old Church Slavonic zlato, Russian zoloto, Old English gold, Gothic gulþ "gold;" Old English glæs "glass; a glass vessel."

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*ghel- (1)

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to call." 

It forms all or part of: nightingale; yell; yelp

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek kikhle "thrush," also a kind of fish, khelidon "the swallow;" Lithuanian gulbinti "to praise;" Old English galan "to sing," galdor "spell, charm, magic, enchantment," giellan "to yell," gielpan "to boast."  

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Chloe 

fem. proper name, Latin, from Greek Khloē, literally "young green shoot;" related to khlōros "greenish-yellow," from PIE *ghlo- variant of root *ghel- (2) "to shine," with derivatives denoting "green" and "yellow."

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glare (v.)
late 13c., "to shine brightly," from or related to Middle Dutch, Middle Low German glaren "to gleam," from Proto-Germanic *glaz-, from PIE root *ghel- (2) "to shine." Sense of "stare fiercely" is from late 14c. Related: Glared; glaring.
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chloro- 

before vowels chlor-, word-forming element used in chemistry, usually indicating the presence of chlorine in a compound, but sometimes "green," from Latinized combining form of Greek khlōros "greenish-yellow" (from PIE root *ghel- (2) "to shine," with derivatives denoting "green" and "yellow").

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cholecyst (n.)
"gall bladder," 1846, from medical Latin cholecystis, incorrectly formed from Greek khole "gall" (from PIE root *ghel- (2) "to shine," with derivatives denoting "green, yellow," and thus "bile, gall") + kystis "bladder, cyst" (see cyst). Related: Cholecystectomy.
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zloty (n.)
monetary unit of Poland, 1842, from Polish złoty, literally "of gold," from złoto "gold," related to Russian zoloto, Czech zlato "gold," from suffixed form of PIE root *ghel- (2) "to shine," with derivatives denoting gold (the "bright" metal); see gold.
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Cloris 

fem. proper name, from Chloris, Latin form of Greek Khloris, goddess of flowers (later identified with Roman Flora), literally "greenness, freshness," poetic fem. of khlōros "greenish-yellow, pale green; fresh," related to khloē "young green shoot," from PIE root *ghel- (2) "to shine," with derivatives denoting "green" and "yellow."

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glister (v.)

late 14c., "to glitter, sparkle," probably from or related to Low German glisteren, Middle Dutch glisteren, frequentative forms ultimately from the large group of Germanic gl- words for "smooth; shining; joyful," from PIE root *ghel- (2) "to shine." Related: Glistered; glistering. As a noun, from 1530s.

All is not golde that glistereth [Thomas Becon, "Reliques of Rome," 1563]
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chlorine (n.)

nonmetallic element, the name coined 1810 by English chemist Sir Humphry Davy from Latinized form of Greek khlōros "pale green" (from PIE root *ghel- (2) "to shine," with derivatives denoting "green" and "yellow") + chemical suffix -ine (2). Named for its color. Discovered 1774, but known at first as oxymuriatic acid gas, or dephlogisticated marine acid.

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