Etymology
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Georgia 
the U.S. state was named 1732 as a colony for King George II of Great Britain. The Caucasian nation is so-called for St. George, who is its patron saint (his cult there may continue that of a pre-Christian deity with whom he later was identified), but the name in that place also is said to derive from Arabic or Persian Kurj, or Gurz (the form in the earliest sources, Russian Grusia), which is said to be a name of the native people, of unknown origin. In modern Georgia, the name of the country is Sakartvelo and the people's name is Kartveli. Georgia pine, long-leafed pine of the Southern U.S. states, is from 1796.
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Georgian (adj.)
1855 in reference to the reigns of the first four kings George of England (1714-1830), especially in reference to the decorative style of the era of the first two. From c. 1600 as "pertaining to Georgia" in the Caucasus; 1762 as "pertaining to Georgia" in America; the noun in this sense is c. 1400 (Caucasus), 1741 (America).
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Geechee (n.)
patois of coastal black communities in the southeastern U.S., from the Ogeechee River in Georgia. The name is perhaps from Muskogee and could mean "River of the Uchees," referring to a neighboring people.
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Chattahoochee 
river between Georgia and Alabama, from Muskogee cato-hocce hvcce "marked-rock river," from cvto "rock," hocce "marked" + hvcce "stream."
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Colchis 

in Greek mythology, the name of a region in the far southeast corner of the Black Sea (in what is now Georgia), the homeland of Medea and associated with Jason and the quest for the Golden Fleece. Related: Colchian.

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Swanee 
in Stephen Foster's "Old Folks at Home," river in Georgia and Florida, usually Suwanee, sometimes said to be a corruption of Spanish San Juan [Room]; Bright says the river name is from the Cherokee village of Sawani, for which no etymology is offered.
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Savannah 
port city in U.S. state of Georgia, from savana, name applied to the Native Americans in the area by early European explorers, perhaps from a self-designation of the Shawnee Indians, or from the European topographical term (see savannah).
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Gullah 
"of or pertaining to blacks on the sea-islands of Georgia and South Carolina," 1739 (first attested as a male slave's proper name), of uncertain origin. Early 19c. folk etymology made it a shortening of Angola (homeland of many slaves) or traced it to a West African tribal group called the Golas.
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Creek 

major native tribe or confederation, originally of what is now the southeastern U.S., 1725, named for creek, the geographical feature, and abbreviated from Ochese Creek Indians, from the place in Georgia (now Ocmulgee River) where the English first encountered them. The native name is Muskogee, a word of uncertain origin.

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jarhead (n.)
also jar-head, "U.S. Marine," by 1985 (but in a biographical book with a World War II setting), from jar + head (n.). Also used as a general term of insult (by 1979) and by 1922 as a Georgia dialectal word for "mule."
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