Etymology
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geometric (adj.)

1620s, "pertaining to geometry," shortened form of geometrical (q.v.). In reference to a style of ancient Greek pottery decoration characterized by straight lines and angles, and the associated culture, 1902.

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isometry (n.)

in mathematics, 1941, probably from isometric (q.v.) on the model of geometry/geometric.

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hexagram (n.)

1826 as a type of geometric figure, from hexa- + -gram. I Ching sense attested from 1804.

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rhombus (n.)

slightly earlier and more classical form of rhomb (q.v.), 1560s, from Late Latin rhombus, in the geometric sense.

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semi-solid (adj.)

also semisolid, "half-solid, very viscous," 1803, from semi- + solid (adj.). As a noun, "a surface composed of facets, like a geometric solid, but not closed," by 1891.

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septangle (n.)

"geometric figure having seven sides and seven angles," 1550s, from Late Latin septangulus, from Latin sept- "seven" (see septi-) + angulus "angle" (see angle (n.)). Related: Septangular.

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decahedron (n.)

in geometry, "a solid having ten faces," 1828, from deca- "ten" + -hedron, from Greek hedra "seat, base, chair, face of a geometric solid," from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit."  Related: Decahedral.

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dodecahedron (n.)

"solid having twelve faces," 1560s, from Greek dōdeka "twelve" (see dodeca-) + hedra "seat, base, chair, face of a geometric solid," from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit." Related: Dodecahedral.

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hyperbolic (adj.)

1640s in rhetoric (iperbolical is from early 15c.), from Latin hyperbolic, from Greek hyperbolikos "extravagant," from hyperbole "extravagance," literally "a throwing beyond" (see hyperbole). Geometric sense is from 1670s, from hyperbola + -ic. Related: Hyperbolically.

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icosahedron (n.)

"twenty-sided body," 1560s, from Latinized form of Greek eikosahedron, noun use of neuter of eikosahedros, from eikosi "twenty" + -hedra "seat, base, chair, face of a geometric solid," from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit." Greek eikosi is from PIE *wikmti- "twenty," from *wi- "in half" (hence "two") + (d)kmti-, from root *dekm- "ten" (from PIE root *dekm- "ten"). Related: icosahedral.

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