Etymology
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gel (n.)

"semi-solid substance," 1899, as a chemical term, short for gelatin and perhaps influenced by jell. The invention of this word is credited to Scottish chemist Thomas Graham. Hair-styling sense is from 1958.

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gel (v.)
1902, "to become a gel," from gel (n.). Figurative sense "come together and agree well" is from 1958. Related: Gelled; gelling.
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*gel- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "cold; to freeze." 

It forms all or part of: chill; cold; congeal; cool; gel; gelatine; gelatinous; gelato; gelid; glace; glacial; glaciate; glaciation; glacier; glaciology; glacis; jell; jelly.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Latin gelare "to freeze," gelu "frost," glacies "ice;" Old English cald "cold, cool," German kalt.

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gelid (adj.)

"very cold," c. 1600, from Latin gelidus "icy, cold, frosty," from gelum "frost, ice, intense cold" (from PIE root *gel- "cold; to freeze"). Related: Gelidity.

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gelato (n.)

by 1970, from Italian gelato, literally "frozen," past participle of gelare "to freeze, congeal," from Latin gelare "to freeze, congeal" (from PIE root *gel- "cold; to freeze") 

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glaciology (n.)

1856, from Latin glacies "ice" (probably from a suffixed form of PIE root *gel- "cold; to freeze") + -ology. Related: Glaciological; glaciologist.

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glaciate (v.)

1620s, "to freeze;" 1861 in reference to glaciers, from Latin glaciatus, past participle of glaciare "to turn to ice," from glacies "ice" (probably from a suffixed form of PIE root *gel- "cold; to freeze"). Related: Glaciated; glaciating.

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glaciation (n.)

1640s, "act of freezing," noun of action from past participle stem of Latin glaciare "to freeze," from glacies "ice" (probably from a suffixed form of PIE root *gel- "cold; to freeze"). Geological sense of "presence of a mass of ice covering a region" is from 1863.

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glace (adj.)

"having a smooth, polished surface," as ice does, 1847, from French glacé "iced, glazed," past participle of glacer "to ice, give a gloss to," from glace "ice," from Latin glacies "ice" (probably from a suffixed form of PIE root *gel- "cold; to freeze").

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glacis (n.)

"sloping bank" (especially leading up to a fortification), 1670s, from French glacir "to freeze, make slippery," from Old French glacier "to slip, glide," from Vulgar Latin *glaciare "to make or turn into ice," from Latin glacies "ice" (probably from a suffixed form of PIE root *gel- "cold; to freeze").

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