Etymology
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fuss (n.)

"trifling bustle," 1701, originally colloquial, perhaps an alteration of force (n.), or "echoic of the sound of something sputtering or bubbling" [OED], or from Danish fjas "foolery, nonsense." First attested in Anglo-Irish writers, but there are no obvious connections to words in Irish. To make a fuss was earlier to keep a fuss (1726). Fuss and feathers "bustle and display" is from 1848, American English, suggestive of a game cock or a peacock, originally of U.S. Army Gen. Winfield Scott (1786-1866) in the Mexican-American War.

Gen. Scott is said to be as particular in matters of etiquette and dress as Gen. Taylor is careless. The soldiers call one "Old Rough and Ready," and the other "Old Fuss and Feathers." [The Mammoth, Nov. 15, 1848].
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fuss (v.)
1792, from fuss (n.). Related: Fussed; fussing. Extended form fussify is by 1832.
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fussy (adj.)
1831, from fuss (n.) + -y (2). Related: Fussily; fussiness.
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fussbudget (n.)

"nervous, fidgety person," 1884, from fuss (n.) + budget (n.). One of several similar formulations around this time: Compare fussbox (1901); fusspot (1906). From 1960s associated with the character Lucy in the newspaper comic strip "Peanuts."

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fuzz (n.)
1590s, fusse, first attested in fusball "puff ball of tiny spores," of uncertain origin; perhaps a back-formation from fuzzy, if that word is older than the record of it. Meaning "the police" is American English, 1929, underworld slang; origin, signification, and connection to the older word unknown. Perhaps a variant of fuss, with a notion of "hard to please."
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bustle (n.1)
"activity, stir, fuss, commotion," 1630s (Milton), from bustle (v.).
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stink (n.)

mid-13c., "strong offensive odor," from stink (v.). Sense of "extensive fuss" is attested by 1812.

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chi-chi (adj.)

also chichi, "extremely chic, sophisticated," also, as a noun, "pretentious fussiness," 1908, from French chichi "airs, fuss." Perhaps, like frou-frou, imitative.

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short-order (adj.)

in restaurants, indicating dishes to be prepared and served up quickly, by 1897, from the adverbial expression in short order "rapidly, with no fuss;" see short (adj.) + order (n.).

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to-do (n.)
1570s, from the verb phrase to do, from Old English to don "proper or necessary to be done" (see to + do). Meaning "disturbance, fuss" is first recorded 1827. Similar formation in French affaire, from à "to" + faire "do."
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