Etymology
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furnace (n.)
early 13c., from Old French fornais "oven, furnace," figuratively "flame of love" (12c.), from Latin fornacem (nominative fornax) "an oven, kiln," related to fornus/furnus "oven," and to formus "warm," from PIE root *gwher- "to heat, warm."
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*gwher- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to heat, warm."

It forms all or part of: brand; brandish; brandy; brimstone; brindled; forceps; Fornax; fornicate; fornication; fornix; furnace; hypothermia; thermal; thermo-; Thermopylae; Thermos.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit gharmah "heat;" Old Persian Garmapada-, name of the fourth month, corresponding to June/July, from garma- "heat;" Hittite war- "to burn;" Armenian jerm "warm;" Greek thermos "warm;" Latin formus "warm," fornax "oven;" Old Irish fogeir "heated;" Old English bærnan "to kindle."

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Shadrach 
name of one of the three children delivered from the "fiery furnace" in Daniel iii.26.
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Fornax (n.)

goddess of ovens in ancient Rome, from Latin fornax "furnace, oven, kiln" (from PIE root *gwher- "to heat, warm"). The dim constellation (representing a chemical furnace) was created by French astronomer Nicolas Louis de La Caille in 1752.

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tandoor (n.)
1660s, from Turkish pronunciation of Persian and Arabic tannur "oven, portable furnace" (see tandoori).
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stoker (n.)
1650s, "one who maintains the fire in a furnace," agent noun from Dutch stoken "to stoke" (see stoke (v.)).
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pig iron (n.)

"iron in pigs," as it comes from a blast furnace, iron that has been run while molten into a mold in sand, 1660s; see pig (n.2) + iron (n.).

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fireman (n.)
also fire-man, late 14c., "tender of a fire," from fire (n.) + man (n.). From 1650s as "furnace-tender" of a early steam engine. As "person hired to put out (rather than tend) fires" it is attested from 1714. For "stoker," Old English had fyrbeta.
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chimney (n.)

late 13c., "furnace;" late 14c., "smoke vent of a fireplace, vertical structure raised above a house for smoke to escape to the open air;" from Old French cheminee "fireplace; room with a fireplace; hearth; chimney stack" (12c., Modern French cheminée), from Medieval Latin caminata "a fireplace," from Late Latin (camera) caminata "fireplace; room with a fireplace," from Latin caminatus, adjective of caminus "furnace, forge; hearth, oven; flue," from Greek kaminos "furnace, oven, brick kiln," which is of uncertain origin.

From the persistence of the medial i in OF. it is seen that the word was not an ancient popular word, but a very early adoption of caminata with subsequent phonetic evolution [OED]

Jamieson [1808] notes that in vulgar use in Scotland it typically was pronounced "chimley." From the same source are Old High German cheminata, German Kamin, Russian kaminu, Polish komin. Chimney-corner "space beside a fireplace" is from 1570s. 

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Budapest 
Hungarian capital, formed 1872 from merger of two cities on opposite shores of the Danube, Buda (probably from a word originally meaning "water") + Pest, a Hungarian word meaning "furnace, oven, cove," also in Slavic (compare Russian pech'). Ofen, literally "oven," was the old German name for the place.
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