Etymology
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fur (n.)

late 14c. "trimming or lining of a garment" (implied c. 1300 in surname Furhode "fur hood"), probably from Old French forrer, fourrer "cover with fur, line (clothing)," in general "to cover, fill with," from fuerre "sheath, scabbard" (via notion of "covering"), from Frankish *fodr or another Germanic source, from Proto-Germanic *fodram "sheath" (source also of Old Frisian foder "coat lining," Old High German fotar "a lining," German Futter, Gothic fodr "sword sheath"), from PIE root *pa- "to feed, protect."

First applied c. 1400 to the hairy pelt of an animal, whether still on the animal or not. The Old French noun might have had the sense "hide, fur, pelt" (and thus might serve as the immediate source of the English noun), but this is not attested. Absent this, the sense transfer from the lining to the material that goes to make it probably happened in English. As an adjective from 1590s.

I'le make the fur Flie 'bout the eares of the old Cur. [Butler, "Hudibras," 1663]
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fur (v.)
c. 1300 (implied in furred), from fur (n.) or Old French fourrer "to line." Related: Furring.
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furry (adj.)
1670s, "made of fur, covered with fur," from fur + -y (2). As a noun, in reference to "anthropomorphic animal characters with human personalities," also of people who identify with them, by 1995. Related: Furriness; furries.
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furrier (n.)

"dealer or dresser in furs," late 15c.; as a surname late 13c. (Osberto le ffurrere), via Anglo-French from Old French forreor "furrier," from forrer "to line or trim with fur" (see fur (n.)).

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*pa- 
*pā-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to protect, feed."

It forms all or part of: antipasto; appanage; bannock; bezoar; companion; company; feed; fodder; food; forage; foray; foster; fur; furrier; impanate; pabulum; panatela; panic (n.2) "type of grass;" pannier; panocha; pantry; pastern; pastor; pasture; pester; repast; satrap.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek pateisthai "to feed;" Latin pabulum "food, fodder," panis "bread," pasci "to feed," pascare "to graze, pasture, feed," pastor "shepherd," literally "feeder;" Avestan pitu- "food;" Old Church Slavonic pasti "feed cattle, pasture;" Russian pishcha "food;" Old English foda, Gothic fodeins "food, nourishment."
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furuncle (n.)
"a boil, circumscribed inflammation on the skin," 1670s, from Latin furunculus, "a boil, burning sore," also "petty thief, pilferer," diminutive of fur "thief" (see furtive). Related: Furuncular; furunculous.
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furtive (adj.)

16c., from French furtif (16c.), from Latin furtivus "stolen," hence also "hidden, secret," from furtum "theft, robbery; a stolen thing," from fur (genitive furis) "a thief, extortioner," also a general term of abuse, "rascal, rogue," probably from PIE *bhor-, from root *bher- (1) "to carry; to bear children." Related: Furtiveness.

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furbelow (n.)

"puffed flounce, plaited border," c. 1700, folk-etymology alteration (as if fur below) of falbala, from French falbala (17c., cognate with Provençal farbello), from Italian falda "fold, flap, pleat," from a Germanic source, from Proto-Germanic *faldan (from PIE root *pel- (2) "to fold"). As a verb from 1701.

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vair (n.)
"squirrel fur," or some other kind of fur in use in the Middle Ages, c. 1300, from Old French vair "two-toned squirrel fur; fur garments" (12c.), from Latin varium, masculine accusative singular of varius "parti-colored" (see vary). Gray or black above and white below.
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miniver (n.)

a type of fur once commonly used for lining and trimming in garments, mid-13c., from Old French menu vair "minor fur;" see menu + vair. The exact description of the thing and meaning of the term is now unclear; according to older French sources, it came from some kind of squirrel.

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