Etymology
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funeral (n.)
"ceremony of burying a dead person," 1510s, probably short for funeral service, etc., from funeral (adj.).
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funeral (adj.)
late 14c., "pertaining to the burial of the dead," mid-15c., from Medieval Latin funeralia "funeral rites," originally neuter plural of Late Latin funeralis "having to do with a funeral," from Latin funus (genitive funeris) "funeral, funeral procession, burial rites; death, corpse," a word of uncertain origin, perhaps ultimately from PIE root *dheu- (3) "to die." Singular and plural used interchangeably in English until c. 1700. In Elizabethan times also a verb, "to mourn" (transitive). The classical Latin adjective was funebris.
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funebrial (adj.)
c. 1600, with -al (1) + Latin funebris "of or pertaining to a funeral," from funer-, stem of funus "a funeral" (see funeral (adj.)).
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funerary (adj.)
"pertaining to funerals or burials," 1690s, from Late Latin funerarius, from funer-, stem of funus "a funeral" (see funeral (adj.)).
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funereal (adj.)

"suitable for a funeral" (mournful, dismal, gloomy), 1725, from stem of Latin funereus "of a funeral," from funus "funeral; death" (see funeral) + -al (1). Perhaps by influence of French funerail.

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funest (adj.)

"portending death," 1650s, obsolete from 18c. except in poetry, from French funeste "unlucky" (14c.), from Latin funestus "causing death, destructive; mournful," from funus "a funeral" (see funeral (n.)). Related: Funestal (1550s).

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obsequy (n.)

late 14c., obsequi, in plural, "funeral rites, a funeral," from Anglo-French obsequie, Old French obseque, osseque "funeral rites" and directly from Medieval Latin obsequiae, influenced in sense by confusion of Latin obsequium "compliance" (see obsequious) with exsequiae "funeral rites." Typically in plural, obsequies.

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epitaph (n.)

"inscription on a tomb or monument," mid-14c., from Old French epitaphe (12c.) and directly from Medieval Latin epitaphium "funeral oration, eulogy," from Greek epitaphion "a funeral oration," noun use of neuter of epitaphios (logos) "(words) spoken on the occasion of a funeral," from epi "at, over" (see epi-) +  taphos "tomb, burial, funeral," related to taphē  "interment," thaptō "to bury," which is of uncertain origin. It is traditionally derived (along with Armenian damban "tomb") from a PIE root *dhembh- "to dig, bury," but there are doubts, and Beekes writes, "Armenian and Greek could well be borrowings; IE origin is uncertain." Related: Epitaphial. Among the Old English equivalents was byrgelsleoð.

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pallbearer (n.)

also pall-bearer, "one who with others attends the coffin at a funeral," 1707, from pall (n.) in the sense of "cloth spread over a coffin" + agent noun of bear (v.). Originally one who holds the corners of the pall at a funeral.

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