Etymology
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fund (n.)

1670s, "a bottom, the bottom; foundation, groundwork," from French fond "a bottom, floor, ground" (12c.), also "a merchant's basic stock or capital," from Latin fundus "bottom, foundation, piece of land" (from PIE root *bhudh- "bottom, base," source also of Sanskrit budhnah, Greek pythmen "foundation, bottom," Old English botm "lowest part;" see bottom (n.)). Meaning "stock of money or wealth available for some purpose" is from 1690s; sense of "store of anything to be drawn upon" is from 1704. Funds "money at one's disposal" is from 1728.

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fund (v.)
1776, "convert (a debt) into capital or stock represented by interest-bearing bonds," from fund (n.). Meaning "supply (someone or something) with money, to finance" is from 1900.
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fund-raiser (n.)
also fundraiser, 1957, from fund (n.) + raise (v.).
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re-fund (v.)

"to fund again or anew, replenish a (public) fund or debt," 1860, from re- + fund (v.). With hyphenated spelling and full pronunciation of the prefix to distinguish it from refund. Related: Re-funded; re-funding.

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funded (adj.)
1776, "existing in the form of interest-bearing bonds," past-participle adjective from fund (v.).
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crowdfund (v.)

by 2011, from crowd (n.) + fund (v.). Related: Crowdfunded; crowdfunding.

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funding (n.)
1776, verbal noun from fund (v.).
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defund (v.)

"prevent from continuing to receive funds," by 1978; see de- + fund (v.). Related: Defunded; defunding.

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unfunded (adj.)
1776, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of fund (v.).
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fundus (n.)
"bottom, depths; base of an organ," 1754, from Latin fundus "bottom" (see fund (n.)). In any general use it probably is extended from specific senses in anatomy.
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