Etymology
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fuel (n.)
c. 1200, feuel, feul "fuel, material for burning," also figurative, from Old French foaille "fuel for heating," from Medieval Latin legal term focalia "right to demand material for making fire, right of cutting fuel," from classical Latin focalia "brushwood for fuel," from neuter plural of Latin focalis "pertaining to a hearth," from focus "hearth, fireplace" (see focus (n.)). Figurative use from 1570s. Of food, as fuel for the body, 1876. As "combustible liquid for an internal combustion engine" from 1886. A French derivative is fouailler "woodyard." Fuel-oil is from 1882.
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fuel (v.)
1590s, "feed or furnish with fuel," literal and figurative, from fuel (n.). Intransitive sense "to get fuel" (originally firewood) is from 1880. Related: Fueled; fueling.
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biofuel (n.)
also bio-fuel, by 1984, from bio- + fuel (n.).
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refuel (v.)

also re-fuel, "supply again with fuel, refill with fuel," 1811, from re- "again" + fuel (v.). Originally in a spiritual sense; later of gas tanks, motor vehicles, etc. Related: Refueled; refuelling.

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gas-guzzler (n.)
car with low fuel-efficiency, 1973, American English, from gas (short for gasoline) + guzzler.
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pine-knot (n.)

"resinous knot of a pine tree, used as fuel," 1660s, from pine (n.1) + knot (n.).

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cord-wood (n.)

"cut wood sold by the cord for fuel," 1630s, from cord in the wood-measure sense + wood (n.).

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fascine (n.)
"bundle used in fortification or as fuel for fire," 1680s, from French fascine, from Latin fascina, from fascis "bundle" (see fasces).
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burn-out (n.)
also burnout, "drug user," by 1972, slang, from the verbal phrase, which is attested from 1590s in the sense "burn until fuel is exhausted;" see burn (v.) + out (adv.). The immediate source is perhaps the use of the phrase in reference to electrical circuits, "fuse or cease to function from overload" (1931). Also compare burnt out "extinct after entire consumption of fuel" (1837). Meaning "mental exhaustion from continuous effort" is from 1975.
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briquette (n.)
also briquet, "small brick," 1870, especially "block of compressed coal dust held together by pitch," used for fuel, from French briquette (18c.), diminutive of brique (see brick (n.)).
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