Etymology
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fry (v.)

late 13c., "cook (something) in a shallow pan over a fire," from Old French frire "to fry" (13c.), from Latin frigere "to roast or fry," from PIE *bher- "to cook, bake" (source also of Sanskrit bhrjjati "roasts," bharjanah "roasting;" Persian birishtan "to roast;" perhaps also Greek phrygein "to roast, bake"). Intransitive sense is from late 14c. U.S. slang meaning "execute in the electric chair" is U.S. slang from 1929. As a noun, "fried meat," from 1630s. Related: Fried; frying. Frying pan is recorded from mid-14c. (friing panne).

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fry (n.)
early 14c. (late 13c. in Anglo-Latin), "young fish," probably from an Anglo-French noun from Old French frier, froier "to rub, spawn (by rubbing abdomen on sand)," from Vulgar Latin *frictiare. First applied to human offspring c. 1400, in Scottish. Some sources trace this usage, or the whole of the word, to Old Norse frjo, fræ "seed, offspring."
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fryer (n.)
also frier, 1851 of fish for frying, 1923 of chickens; from fry (v.).
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fried (adj.)
mid-14c., past-participle adjective from fry (v.). Fried chicken attested by 1832.
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pommes frites (n.)

"fried potatoes," 1872, French, from pomme "potato" (see pome); also see fry (v.).

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frit (n.)
"material for glass-making," 1660s, from Italian fritta, noun use of fem. past participle of friggere "to fry," from Latin frigere "to roast, poach, fry" (see fry (v.)).
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refry (v.)

"fry again, fry a second time," 193, in refried beans, which translates Spanish frijoles refritos. From re- "again" + fry (v.).

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frittata (n.)
1884, from Italian frittata "a fritter," from fritto "fried," past participle of friggere, from Latin frigere (see fry (v.)). Earlier in English as frittado (1630s).
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fritter (n.)
"fried batter cake," served hot and sometimes sweetened or seasoned or with other food in it, late 14c., from Old French friture "fritter, pancake, something fried" (12c.), from Late Latin frictura "a frying," from frigere "to roast, fry" (see fry (v.)).
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frying-pan (n.)

"metal pan with a handle, used for frying," mid-14c., from verbal noun from fry (v.) + pan (n.). To go out of the frying-pan into the fire ("from a bad situation to a worse one") is attested in Thomas More (1532).

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