Etymology
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frontier (n.)

c. 1400, frowntere, "front line of an army;" early 15c., fronture, "borderland, part of a country which faces another," from Old French frontiere "boundary-line of a country," also "frontier fortress; front rank of an army" (13c.), noun use of adjective frontier "facing, neighboring," from front "brow" (see front (n.)). In reference to North America, "part of the country which is at the edge of its settled regions" from 1670s. Later it was given a specific sense:

What is the frontier? ... In the census reports it is treated as the margin of that settlement which has a density of two or more to the square mile. [F.J. Turner, "The Frontier in American History," 1920]
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frontiersman (n.)
1814, American English, from genitive of frontier + man (n.). Earlier was frontierman (1782).
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buck (n.2)
"dollar," 1856, American English, perhaps an abbreviation of buckskin as a unit of trade among Indians and Europeans in frontier days (attested from 1748).
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marquis (n.)

also marquess, c. 1300, marchis, title of nobility, from Old French marchis, marcheis, marquis, etymologically "a prefect of the marches, ruler of a border area," from Old French marche "frontier," from Medieval Latin marca "frontier, frontier territory" (see march (n.1)). Originally the ruler of border territories in various European regions (compare Italian marchese, Spanish marqués, and see margrave); later a mere title of rank, below duke and above earl or count. Related: Marquisate.

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wooly (adj.)
also woolly, 1570s, "resembling or made of wool," from wool + -y (2). Meaning "barbarous, rude" is recorded 1891, from wild and wooly (1884) applied to the U.S. western frontier, perhaps in reference to range steers or to unkempt cowboys. Related: Wooliness.
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Byblos 
ancient Phoenician port (modern Jebeil, Lebanon) from which Egyptian papyrus was exported to Greece. The name probably is a Greek corruption of Phoenician Gebhal, said to mean literally "frontier town" or "mountain town" (compare Hebrew gebhul "frontier, boundary," Arabic jabal, Canaanite gubla "mountain"), which is perhaps a folk-etymology of the older Phoenician name, which might contain El "god." The Greek name also might have been influenced by, or come from, an Egyptian word for "papyrus."
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borderline (n.)

also border-line, 1847, "strip of land along a frontier," from border (n.) + line (n.). As an adjective meaning "verging on" it is attested from 1903, originally in medical jargon.

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bowie knife (n.)
"heavy-single-edged sheath-knife used early 19c. on the U.S. frontier," 1827, named for its inventor, U.S. fighter and frontiersman Col. James "Jim" Bowie (1799-1836), and properly pronounced "boo-ee."
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Ukraine 

by 1670s, from Russian or Polish Ukraina, a specific use of ukraina "border, frontier," according to Room, from Old Russian oukraina, from ou "by, at" + kraj region. He also notes that "The territory was so called because it was the borderland or 'frontier zone' of medieval Russia at the time of the Tatar invasion in the 13th century."

Ukraine was formerly also known as Little Russia, so called by contrast with Great Russia, when the medieval principality here became separated from 'mainstream' czarist Russia as a result of the Mongol invasion. [Room, 2006]

Related: Ukrainian.

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claustrophobia (n.)

"morbid fear of being shut up in a confined space," coined 1879 (in article by Italian-born, French-naturalized Swiss-English physician Dr. Benjamin Ball), with -phobia "fear" + Latin claustrum "a bolt, a means of closing; a place shut in, confined place, frontier fortress" (in Medieval Latin "cloister"), from past participle of claudere "to close" (see close (v.)).

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