Etymology
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frill (n.)
"wavy ornamental edging," 1801 (with a doubtful attestation from 1590s), of uncertain origin despite much speculation [see OED]; figurative sense of "useless ornament" first recorded 1893. Related: Frills.
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frill (v.)
"to furnish with a frill," 1570s, from frill (n.) "ornamental bordering." Related: Frilled.
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frilly (adj.)
1843, from frill + -y (2). Related: Frilliness.
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frills (n.)
"mere embellishments," 1893, often in negative constructions; earlier "affectation of dress or manner" (1845), U.S. colloquial, from frill (n.) "ornamental bordering."
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frillery (n.)
"frills collectively; a frilly arrangement," 1842, from frill (n.) + -ery. Related: Frilleries.
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jabot (n.)
1823, "frill of a men's shirt," from French jabot "gizzard (of a bird), frill on a shirt front" (16c.), a word of unknown origin. Klein suggests a connection with gaver "to cram, gorge," and thus ultimately with English jaw (n.). Of women's clothing from 1869.
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ruche (n.)

type of frill, a full plaiting of material used as trimming for women's garments at the neck and wrists, 1827, from French ruche "frill," literally "beehive" (13c.), a word of Celtic origin (compare Breton rusken), from Proto-Celtic *rusca "bark." The notion is the resemblance to the plaiting in straw beehives. Related: Ruched; ruching.

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ruffle (n.)

"ornamental frill of textile material drawn up at one end in gathers or plaits," 1707, from ruffle (v.). The sense of "disturbance, perturbation" is by 1704.

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ruff (n.1)

kind of large band or frill, stiffly starched, 1520s, originally in reference to sleeves (of collars, from 1550s), probably a shortened form of ruffle (n.). They were especially common in the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Extended to distinctive sets of feathers on the necks of birds from 1690s.

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no-frills (adj.)

1957, from no + frills. The expression no thrills meaning "without extra flourishes or ornamentation" is in use from 1870s; the original notion probably is of plain clothing.

Man with no frills (American) a plain person, a man without culture or refinement. An amiable term to express a vulgar fellow. [Albert Barrère and Charles G. Leland, "A Dictionary of Slang, Jargon & Cant," Ballantyne Press, 1890]
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