Etymology
Advertisement
frequentative (n.)

"verb which expresses repetition of action," 1520s, from French fréquentatif, from Late Latin frequentativus "serving to denote the repetition of an act," from Latin frequentat-, past-participle stem of frequentare "visit regularly; do frequently, repeat," from frequentem (see frequent (adj.)). Frequentive is considered incorrect, because -ive adjectives are normally formed on the Latin past participle.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
tootle (v.)
1820, frequentative of toot (v.). Related: Tootled; tootling.
Related entries & more 
slumber (v.)
mid-14c. alteration of slumeren (mid-13c.), frequentative form of slumen "to doze," probably from Old English sluma "light sleep" (compare Middle Dutch slumen, Dutch sluimeren, German schlummern "to slumber"). Frequentative on the notion of "intermittent light sleep." For the -b-, compare number, lumber, chamber, etc. Related: Slumbered; slumbering.
Related entries & more 
whinner (v.)
"to whine feebly," c. 1700, frequentative of whine. Related: Whinnered; whinnering.
Related entries & more 
snuggle (v.)
1680s, frequentative form of snug. Related: Snuggled; snuggling. As a noun from 1901.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
domitable (adj.)

"capable of being tamed," 1670s, a rare word, from Latin *domitabilis, from domitare, frequentative of domare "to tame" (see tame (adj.)).

Related entries & more 
grabble (v.)
1570s, probably from Dutch grabbelen, frequentative of grabben (see grab (v.)). Related: Grabbled; grabbling.
Related entries & more 
gabble (v.)
"to talk noisily, rapidly, and incoherently," 1570s, frequentative of gab (v.), or else imitative. Related: Gabbled; gabbling.
Related entries & more 
natant (adj.)

"swimming, floating," 1707, from Latin natantem, present participle of natare "to swim," frequentative of nare "to swim" (from PIE root *sna- "to swim"). Related: Natantly.

Related entries & more 
nuzzle (v.)

early 15c., "to bring the nose to the ground," back-formation from noselyng "face-downward, on the nose, in a prostrate position" (c. 1400), frequentative of nose (v.). The meaning "burrow with the nose, thrust the nose into" is attested from 1520s; that of "lie snug" is from 1590s, influenced by nestle, or by nursle, frequentative of nurse (v.). Related: Nuzzled; nuzzling.

Related entries & more