Etymology
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french (v.)
"perform oral sex on," c. 1917, from French (adj.), reflecting Anglo-Saxon equation of Gallic culture and sexual sophistication. Related: Frenched; frenching.
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French (n.)
from Old English frencisc (early Middle English frencisc, frenscen) "French person; the French nation," from the adjective (see French (adj.)). From c. 1300 as "the French language." Euphemistic meaning "bad language" (pardon my French) is from 1895. French Français is from Medieval Latin *francencis, from francus "a Frank" + nationality suffix -ensis "belonging to" (see -ese).
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Frenchify (v.)
1590s, from French + -ify. Usually contemptuous (Richardson in his introduction to "Pamela," beseeches the editor not to "Frenchify our English solidity into froth and whip-syllabub"). Related: Frenchified; Frenchifying.
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Franglais (n.)
"French marred by many English and American words," 1964, from French (1959), from français "French" + anglais "English."
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rasp (n.)

"coarse, toothed file," 1540s, from French raspe (Modern French râpe), from Old French rasper "to rasp" (see rasp (v.)).

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treasurer (n.)
late 13c., from Old North French, Anglo-French tresorer, Old French tresorier, from tresor (see treasure (n.)). Treasury bill attested from 1797.
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chez (prep.)

1740, from French chez "at the house of," from Old French chiese "house" (12c.), from Latin casa "house." Used with French personal names, meaning "house of _____."

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demure (adj.)

late 14c. (early 14c. as an Anglo-French surname), "calm, settled;" of persons, "sober, grave, serious," from an Anglo-French extended form of Old French meur "mature, fully grown, ripe," hence "discreet" (Modern French mûr), from Latin maturus "mature" (see mature (v.)). The de- in this word is of uncertain meaning and origin. Barnhart suggests the Anglo-French word is from Old French demore, past participle of demorer "to stay," and influenced by meur. Klein suggests Old French de (bon) murs "of good manners," from murs (Modern French moeurs).

Now usually meaning "affectedly decorous, reserved, or coy" (1690s). Related: Demurely; demureness.

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islet (n.)

1530s, from French islette (Modern French îlette), diminutive of isle (see isle).

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scarcity (n.)

"insufficiency, want, dearth," c. 1300, scarsete, from a shortening of Anglo-French and Old North French escarcete (Old French escharsete), from eschars "scanty, scarce" (see scarce).

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