Etymology
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freight (v.)
"to load (a ship) with goods or merchandise for shipment," mid-15c. variant of Middle English fraught (v.) "to load (a ship)," c. 1400; see fraught, and compare freight (n.). Figuratively, "to carry or transport," 1530s. Related: Freighted; freighting.
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freight (n.)
early 15c. "transporting of goods and passengers by water," variant of fraght, which is from Middle Dutch or Middle Low German vracht, vrecht (see fraught). Danish fragt, Swedish frakt apparently also are from Dutch or Frisian. Also from Low German are Portuguese frete, Spanish flete, and French fret, which might have changed the vowel in this variant of the English word. Meaning "cargo of a ship" is from c. 1500. Freight-train is from 1841.
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car (n.)
Origin and meaning of car
c. 1300, "wheeled vehicle," from Anglo-French carre, Old North French carre, from Vulgar Latin *carra, related to Latin carrum, carrus (plural carra), originally "two-wheeled Celtic war chariot," from Gaulish karros, a Celtic word (compare Old Irish and Welsh carr "cart, wagon," Breton karr "chariot"), from PIE *krsos, from root *kers- "to run."

"From 16th to 19th c. chiefly poetic, with associations of dignity, solemnity, or splendour ..." [OED]. Used in U.S. by 1826 of railway freight carriages and of passenger coaches on a railway by 1830; by 1862 of streetcars or tramway cars. Extension to "automobile" is by 1896, but from 1831 to the first decade of 20c. the cars meant "railroad train." Car bomb first attested 1972, in reference to Northern Ireland. The Latin word also is the source of Italian and Spanish carro, French char.
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car-wash (n.)
also carwash, by 1924, "act of washing an automobile," also "commercial establishment where an automobile can be washed," from car (n.) + wash (n.).
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flat-car (n.)
1839 in railroading, from flat (adj.) + car (n.).
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cable-car (n.)
"car on a cable railroad," 1879, from cable (n.) + car. A streetcar moved by an endless cable which is cased in a small tunnel under the railway and kept in motion by a remote stationary engine.
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hand-car (n.)
1846 in railroading sense, from hand (n.) + car.
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stock-car (n.)
racing car with a basic chassis of an ordinary commercially produced vehicle, 1914, American English, from stock (n.2) + car. Earlier "a railroad car used to transport livestock" (1858).
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car-park (n.)

"place for parking automobiles," 1926, British English, from car (n.) + park (n.).

Oh the torn up ticket stubs
From a hundred thousand mugs
Now washed away with dead dreams in the rain;
And the car-park's going up
And they're pulling down the pubs
And it's just another bloody rainy day
[The Pogues, "White City," 1989]
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