Etymology
Advertisement
fragrant (adj.)

"affecting the sense of smell in a pleasing manner, having a noticeable perfume," mid-15c., from Latin fragrantem (nominative fragrans) "sweet-smelling," present participle of fragrare "smell strongly, emit (a sweet) odor," from Proto-Italic *fragro-, from PIE root *bhrag- "to smell" (source also of Old Irish broimm "break wind," Middle High German bræhen "to smell," Middle Dutch bracke, Old High German braccho "hound, setter;" see brach). Often used figuratively. Usually of pleasing or agreeable smells, but sometimes ironic. Related: Fragrantly.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
fragrance (n.)
1660s, from French fragrance or directly from Late Latin fragrantia, from stem of Latin fragrans "sweet-smelling" (see fragrant). Related: Fragrancy (1570s).
Related entries & more 
flair (n.)

mid-14c., "an odor," from Old French flaire "odor or scent," especially in hunting, "fragrance, sense of smell," from flairier "to give off an odor; stink; smell sweetly" (Modern French flairer), from Vulgar Latin *flagrare, a dissimilation of Latin fragrare "emit (a sweet) odor" (see fragrant). Sense of "special aptitude" is American English, 1925, probably from hunting and the notion of a hound's ability to track scent.

Related entries & more 
basmati (n.)
"superior variety of rice," 1845, from Hindi, literally "fragrant."
Related entries & more 
odiferous (adj.)

c. 1500, odeferus, "fragrant," a shortened variant of odoriferous. Related: Odiferously; odiferousness.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
orange-blossom (n.)

"fragrant, white blossom of the orange tree," 1786, from orange (n.) + blossom (n.). Especially as worn by brides; "the custom appears to have been introduced from France c 1820-30" [OED].

Related entries & more 
balmy (adj.)
c. 1500, "delicately fragrant," from balm + -y (2). Figurative use for "soft and soothing" dates from c. 1600; of breezes, air, etc. "mild, fragrant" (combining both earlier senses) it is first attested 1704. Meaning "weak-minded, idiotic," 1851, is from London slang, perhaps by confusion with barmy. Related: Balmily.
Related entries & more 
ambrosial (adj.)

1590s, "immortal, divine, of the quality of ambrosia;" see ambrosia + -al. The sense of "fragrant, delicious" is from 1660s. Other adjectives were ambrosiac (c. 1600); ambrosian (1630s).

Related entries & more 
aromatic (adj.)
c. 1400, aromatyk, "giving out an aroma, fragrant, sweet," from Latin aromaticus, from Greek aromatikos, from aroma (genitive aromatos) "seasoning, sweet spice," which is of unknown origin.
Related entries & more 
balsamic (adj.)
c. 1600, "health-giving," from balsam + -ic. From 1640s as "pertaining to balsam," 1670s as "yielding balsam," 1714 as "aromatic, fragrant." Balsamic vinegar is by 1849.
Related entries & more