Etymology
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foundation (n.)

late 14c., "action of founding," from Old French fondacion "foundation" (14c.) or directly from Late Latin fundationem (nominative fundatio) "a founding," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin fundare "to lay a bottom or foundation" (see found (v.1)). The Latin word is glossed in Old English by staþol.

Specialized sense of "establishment of an institution with an endowment to pay for it" is from late 14c.; meaning "that which is founded" (a college, hospital, etc.) is from 1510s; meaning "funds endowed for benevolent or charitable purposes" is from early 15c. Sense of "solid base of a structure" is from early 15c. The cosmetics sense of "colored cream applied to the face to make it appear uniform in color and texture" is by 1931, probably short for foundation cream or foundation makeup.

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foundational (adj.)
1680s, from foundation + -al (1). Related: Foundationally.
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base (v.)
1580s, "serve as a foundation for;" 1841, "to place on a foundation," from base (n.). Related: Based; basing.
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fundamental (adj.)
mid-15c., "primary, original, pertaining to a foundation," modeled on Late Latin fundamentalis "of the foundation," from Latin fundamentum "foundation" (see fundament). In music (1732) it refers to the lowest note of a chord. Fundamentals (n.) "primary principles or rules" of anything is from 1630s.
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fundament (n.)
late 13c., "foundation, base; buttocks, anus," from Old French fondement "foundation, bottom; land, estate; anus" (12c.), from Latin fundamentum "a foundation, ground-work; support; beginning," from fundare "to found" (see bottom (n.)). So called because it is where one sits.
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basis (n.)
1570s, "bottom or foundation" (of something material), from Latin basis "foundation," from Greek basis "a going, a step; a stand, base, that whereon one stands," from bainein "to go, walk, step," from PIE root *gwa- "to go, come." Transferred and figurative senses (of immaterial things) are from c. 1600.
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Warfarin (n.)
1950, from WARF, acronym from Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation + -arin, from Coumarin. The organization describes itself as "an independent, nonprofit foundation chartered to support research at the U[niversity of] W[isconsin]-Madison and the designated technology transfer organization for the university."
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unfounded (adj.)
1640s, "having no foundation or basis," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of found (v.1).
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found (v.1)
"lay the basis of, establish," late 13c., from Old French fonder "found, establish; set, place; fashion, make" (12c.), from Latin fundare "to lay the bottom or foundation" of something, from fundus "bottom, foundation" (see fund (n.)). Related: Founded; founding. Phrase founding fathers with reference to the creators of the American republic is attested from 1916.
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baseless (adj.)
"having no foundation or support," c. 1600, from base (n.) + -less. Related: Baselessly; baselessness.
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