Etymology
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formula (n.)
1630s, "words used in a ceremony or ritual" (earlier as a Latin word in English), from Latin formula "form, draft, contract, regulation;" in law, "a rule, method;" literally "small form," diminutive of forma "form" (see form (n.)). Modern sense is colored by Carlyle's use (1837) of the word in a sense of "rule slavishly followed without understanding" [OED]. From 1706 as "a prescription, a recipe;" mathematical use is from 1796; chemistry sense is from 1842. In motor racing, "class or specification of a car" (usually by engine size), 1927.
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Fortran (n.)
computer programming language, 1956, from combination of elements from formula + translation.
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formular (n.)
1560s, "a model, exemplar," from Latin formula (see formula) + -ar. As an adjective, from 1773 as "formal, correct;" 1880 as "of or pertaining to a formula."
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formulate (v.)
"to express in a formula," 1837, from formula + -ate (2). Won out over formulize (1842); formularize (1845). Related: Formulated; formulating.
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formulae (n.)

classically correct plural of formula; also see -a (1).

Men who try to speak what they believe, are naked men fighting men quilted sevenfold in formulae. [Charles Kingsley, "Letters," 1861]
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formulary (n.)
1540s, "collection of set forms," from French formulaire "collection of formulae," from noun use of Latin adjective formularius, from formula "a form" (see formula). As an adjective in English, "of the nature of a formula," 1728. The Latin adjective also was used as a noun meaning "a lawyer skilled in composing writs."
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thank you 
polite formula used in acknowledging a favor, c. 1400, short for I thank you (see thank). As a noun, from 1792.
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graph (n.)
1878, shortening of graphic formula (see graphic). The verb meaning "to chart on a graph" is from 1889. Related: Graphed; graphing.
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recipe (n.)

1580s, "medical prescription, a formula for the composing of a remedy written by a physician," from French récipé (15c.), from Latin recipe "take!" (this or that ingredient), second person imperative singular of recipere "to hold, contain" (see receive). It was the word written by physicians at the head of prescriptions. Figurative meaning "a prescribed formula" is from 1640s. Meaning "instructions for preparing a particular food" is recorded by 1716. The older sense in English survives chiefly in the pharmacist's abbreviation Rx. Compare receipt.

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