Etymology
Advertisement
format (n.)
1840, "shape and size" (of a book), via French format (18c.), ultimately from Modern Latin liber formatus "a book formed" in a certain shape and size, from past participle of formare "to form," from forma "form, shape" (see form (n.)). Extended to computers by 1955.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
format (v.)
"arrange into a format," 1964, in reference to electronic computing, from format (n.). Related: Formatted; formatting.
Related entries & more 
formative (adj.)

late 15c., from French formatif, from Latin format-, past-participle stem of formare "to form," from forma "form, shape" (see form (n.)). As a noun, in grammar, from 1816.

Related entries & more 
pdf 
by 1992, initialism (acronym) for portable document format, a generic term.
Related entries & more 
gif (n.)
1987, acronym from Graphics Interchange Format.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
oldie (n.)

1874, "an old person;" 1940, "an old tune or film;" from old + -ie. Related: Oldies, which is attested by 1961 as a radio format.

Related entries & more 
back-formation (n.)

also back formation, "word formed from an existing word, often by removal of a suffix or supposed suffix," by 1887, from back (adv.) + formation.

Related entries & more 
formation (n.)

late 14c., "vital force in plants and animals;" early 15c., "act of creating or making," from Old French formacion "formation, fashioning, creation" (12c.) or directly from Latin formationem (nominative formatio) "a forming, shaping," noun of action or condition from past-participle stem of formare "to form," from forma "form, shape" (see form (n.)). Meaning that which is formed or created" is from 1640s. In geology, "group of rocks having a similar origin or character," 1815. Related: Formational.

Related entries & more 
re-formation (n.)

"act of forming anew, a second formation," early 15c., from re- "back, again" + formation. The hyphenation is from 17c. to keep it distinct from reformation, as is the full pronunciation of the prefix.

Related entries & more 
easy (adj.)

c. 1200, "at ease, having ease, free from bodily discomfort and anxiety," from Old French aisie "comfortable, at ease, rich, well-off" (Modern French aisé), past participle of aisier "to put at ease," from aise (see ease (n.)). Sense of "not difficult, requiring no great labor or effort" is from late 13c.; of conditions, "offering comfort, pleasant," early 14c. Of persons, "lenient, kind, calm, gentle," late 14c. Meaning "readily yielding, not difficult of persuasion" is from 1610s. The concept of "not difficult" was expressed in Old English and early Middle English by eaþe (adv.), ieþe (adj.), apparently common West Germanic (compare German öde "empty, desolate," but of disputed origin.

Easy Street is from 1890. Easy money attested by 1889; to take it easy "relax" is from 1804 (be easy in same sense recorded from 1746); easy does it recorded by 1835. Easy rider (1912) was African-American vernacular for "sexually satisfying lover." The easy listening radio format is from 1961, defined by William Safire (in 1986) as, "the music of the 60's played in the 80's with the style of the 40's." Related: Easier; easiest.

Related entries & more