Etymology
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in forma pauperis 
legal Latin, literally "in the form of a poor person" (thus exempt from certain court fees, etc.), 1590s; see form (n.) + pauper (n.).
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pro forma 

also proforma, Latin, literally "for form's sake, by way of formality;" from pro (prep.) "on behalf of" (see pro-) + formā, ablative of forma (see form (n.)). A pro forma invoice is one sent to the purchaser in advance of the ordered goods.

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omnium gatherum (n.)

1520s, "miscellaneous collection," a humorous mock-Latin coinage from Latin omnium "of all things" (genitive plural of omnis; see omni-) + a feigned Latin form of English gather. Earlier form was omnegadrium (early 15c.), omnigatherum.

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in facie curiae 
"before the court," legal Latin, from ablative of Latin facies "form, face" (see face (n.)). + genitive of curia "court" (see curia).
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cui bono 

a Latin phrase from Cicero. It means "to whom for a benefit," or "who profits by it?" not "to what good purpose? for what use or end?" as is sometimes said. From cui "to? for whom?," an old form preserved here in the dative form of the interrogative pronoun quis "who?" (from PIE root *kwo-, stem of relative and interrogative pronouns) + bono "good" (see bene-).

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et cetera 

also etcetera, early 15c., from Latin et cetera, literally "and the others," from et "and" + neuter plural of ceterus "the other, other part, that which remains," from Proto-Italic *ke-etero‑, from *ke-, variant form of PIE root *ko-, the stem of demonstrative pronoun meaning "this" + *etero‑ "other (of two), again, a second time, again," a PIE adjective of comparison.

The common form of the abbreviation before 20c. was &c., but etc. now prevails.

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pro tempore 

"temporary," Latin, literally "for the time (being)," from pro "for" (see pro-) + ablative singular of tempus "time" (see temporal). Abbreviated form pro tem is attested by 1828.

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Ave Maria 
modified form of the angelic salutation to the Virgin (Luke i.28) used as a devotional recitation, early 13c., from the opening words ("Ave [Maria] gratia plena"). See ave + Maria.
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vox populi (n.)
1540s, Latin, literally "voice of the people." The full maxim (first attested in Medieval Latin) is vox populi, vox Dei "the voice of the people is the voice of God." Short form vox pop attested by 1964.
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soap opera (n.)
"melodramatic radio serial" (later extended to television), 1939; so-called because sponsors often were soap manufacturers, from earlier horse opera "a Western" (1927). Shortened form soap for this first attested 1943.
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