Etymology
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form (n.)
c. 1200, forme, fourme, "semblance, image, likeness," from Old French forme, fourme, "physical form, appearance; pleasing looks; shape, image; way, manner" (12c.), from Latin forma "form, contour, figure, shape; appearance, looks; a fine form, beauty; an outline, a model, pattern, design; sort, kind condition," a word of unknown origin. One theory holds that it is from or cognate with Greek morphe "form, beauty, outward appearance" (see Morpheus) via Etruscan [Klein].

From c. 1300 as "physical shape (of something), contour, outline," of a person, "shape of the body;" also "appearance, likeness;" also "the imprint of an object." From c. 1300 as "correct or appropriate way of doing something; established procedure; traditional usage; formal etiquette." Mid-14c. as "instrument for shaping; a mould;" late 14c. as "way in which something is done," also "pattern of a manufactured object." Used widely from late 14c. in theology and Platonic philosophy with senses "archetype of a thing or class; Platonic essence of a thing; the formative principle." From c. 1300 in law, "a legal agreement; terms of agreement," later "a legal document" (mid-14c.). Meaning "a document with blanks to be filled in" is from 1855. From 1590s as "systematic or orderly arrangement;" from 1610s as "mere ceremony." From 1550s as "a class or rank at school" (from sense "a fixed course of study," late 14c.). Form-fitting (adj.) in reference to clothing is from 1893.
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form (v.)
c. 1300, formen, fourmen, "create, give life to, give shape or structure to; make, build, construct, devise," from Old French fourmer "formulate, express; draft, create, shape, mold" (12c.) and directly from Latin formare "to shape, fashion, build," also figurative, from forma "form, contour, figure, shape" (see form (n.)). From late 14c. as "go to make up, be a constituent part of;" intransitive sense "take form, come into form" is from 1722. Related: Formed; forming.
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-form 
word-forming element meaning "-like, -shaped, in the form of," from French -forme and directly from Latin -formis "-like, shaped," from forma "form" (see form (n.)). Properly preceded by an -i-.
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re-form (v.)

"form again, remake, reconstruct, re-create or re-establish," mid-14c., from re- "back, again" + form (v.). Intransitive sense of "form again, get into order or line again" also is from mid-14c. Spelled with a hyphen from 17c. to distinguish it from the specific sense in reform; this is the original meaning of that word, still in use but now with full pronunciation of the prefix. Related: Re-formed; re-forming; re-formation.

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formable (adj.)
late 14c., from form (v.) + -able, or from Late Latin formabilis.
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former (n.)
"one who gives form," mid-14c., agent noun from form (v.). The Latin agent noun was formator.
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formless (adj.)
1590s, from form (n.) + -less. Related: Formlessly; formlessness.
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in forma pauperis 
legal Latin, literally "in the form of a poor person" (thus exempt from certain court fees, etc.), 1590s; see form (n.) + pauper (n.).
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fungiform (adj.)
"mushroom-shaped," 1801, from stem of fungus + -form.
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