Etymology
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foreskin (n.)
1530s, from fore- + skin (n.). A loan-translation of Latin prepuce.
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circumcision (n.)

"the act of cutting off the foreskin," late 12c., from Latin circumcisionem (nominative circumcisio), noun of action from past participle stem of circumcidere "to cut around; cut, clip, trim, prune off," from circum "around" (see circum-) + caedere "to cut" (from PIE root *kae-id- "to strike.").

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prepuce (n.)

c. 1400, "the foreskin," also "the state of being uncircumcised," from Old French prepuce, from Latin praeputium "foreskin," possibly from prae "before" (see pre-) + *putos "penis." Earlier in English as prepucy (late 14c.), directly from Latin. Related: Preputial.

And in this temple was Charlemayn whan þat the aungell broughte him the prepuce of oure lord Ihesu crist of his Circumcisioun. And after kyng Charles leet bryngen it to Parys in to his chapell And after þat he leet brynge it to Peyteres & after þat to Chartres. [Sir John Mandeville, "Voiage and Travaile," mid-14c.]
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circumcise (v.)

mid-13c., "to cut off the foreskin," from Old French circoncisier "circumcise" (12c., Modern French circoncire) and directly from Latin circumcisus, past participle of circumcidere "to cut round, to cut, trim, prune off," from circum "around" (see circum-) + caedere "to cut" (from PIE root *kae-id- "to strike."). Related: Circumcised; circumcising.

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*pel- (3)

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "skin, hide."

It forms all or part of: erysipelas; fell (n.2) "skin or hide of an animal;" film; pell; pellagra; pellicle; pelt (n.) "skin of a fur-bearing animal;" pillion; surplice.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek pella, Latin pellis "skin;" Old English filmen "membrane, thin skin, foreskin."

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film (n.)

Old English filmen "membrane, thin skin, foreskin," from West Germanic *filminjan (source also of Old Frisian filmene "skin," Old English fell "hide"), extended from Proto-Germanic *fello(m) "animal hide," from PIE root *pel- (3) "skin, hide."

Sense of "a thin coat of something" is 1570s, extended by 1845 to the coating of chemical gel on photographic plates. By 1895 this also meant the coating plus the paper or celluloid. Hence "a motion picture" (1905); sense of "film-making as a craft or art" is from 1920.

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