Etymology
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forehead (n.)
Middle English forhed, from Old English forheafod "forehead, brow," from fore- + heafod (see head (n.)). Similar formation in Dutch voorhoofd, German Vorhaupt, Danish forhoved.
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*kaput- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "head."

It forms all or part of: achieve; behead; biceps; cabbage; cabochon; caddie; cadet; cap; cap-a-pie; cape (n.1) "garment;" cape (n.2) "promontory;" capital (adj.); capital (n.3) "head of a column or pillar;" capitate; capitation; capitulate; capitulation; capitulum; capo (n.1) "leader of a Mafia family;" capo (n.2) "pitch-altering device for a stringed instrument;" caprice; capsize; captain; cattle; caudillo; chapter; chef; chief; chieftain; corporal (n.); decapitate; decapitation; forehead; head; hetman; kaput; kerchief; mischief; occipital; precipice; precipitate; precipitation; recapitulate; recapitulation; sinciput; triceps.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit kaput-; Latin caput "head;" Old English heafod, German Haupt, Gothic haubiþ "head."
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frons (n.)
"forehead," from Latin frons (see front (n.)).
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frontlet (n.)
"headband," late 15c., from Old French frontelet, diminutive of frontel "forehead, front of a helmet, hairband" (Modern French fronteau), from Late Latin frontale "an ornament for the forehead," from frons "forehead; front" (see front (n.)).
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frontal (adj.)
"being in front," 1650s, of the forehead; 1971 with reference to the naked standing body; from Modern Latin frontalis, from front-, stem of Latin frons "brow, forehead" (see front (n.)). In some uses probably from front (n.) + adjectival suffix -al (1).
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temple (n.2)
"flattened area on either side of the forehead," mid-14c., from Old French temple "side of the forehead" (11c.), from Vulgar Latin *tempula (plural taken as fem. singular), from Latin tempora, plural of tempus (genitive temporis) "side of the forehead," generally accepted as having originally meant "the thin stretch of skin at the side of the forehead" and being from PIE *temp- "to stretch," an extension of root *ten- "to stretch." The sense development would be from "stretchings" to "stretched skin."

A similar notion seems to be at work in Old English ðunwange, Old Norse þunn-vangi, Old High German dunwangi "temple," literally "thin cheek." The less-likely guess is that it is associated with tempus span "timely space" (for a mortal blow with a sword).
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pompadour (n.)

1750s in reference to fashions of dress, etc., among the French aristocracy, especially a women's hairstyle with the hair swept up over the forehead, in recognition of Jeanne-Antoinette Poisson, Marquise de Pompadour (1721-1764), mistress of Louis XV from 1745-50, who wore her hair in an upswept style rolled off from the forehead over a cushion. Her name also was used in her lifetime in reference to accessories, furniture, and a certain shade of crimson or pink. The estate of Pompadour is in the Limousin region. By 1887 in reference to a men's hairstyle.

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frontispiece (n.)

1590s, "decorated entrance of a building," from French frontispice (16c.), which is probably from Italian frontespizio and Medieval Latin frontispicium "facade," originally "a view of the forehead, judgment of character through facial features," from Latin frons (genitive frontis) "forehead" (see front (n.)) + specere "to look at" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe"). Sense of "illustration facing a book's title page" first recorded 1680s. The English spelling alteration apparently is from confusion with unrelated piece (n.).

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Antaeus 
Libyan giant slain by Herakles, from Latinized form of Greek Antaios, literally "opposite, opposed to, hostile," from anta "over against, face to face," related to anti "opposite, against" (from PIE root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before").
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metopic (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the forehead," 1878, from Greek metōpon, literally "the space between the eyes," from meta "between" (see meta-) + ōps "the eye" (from PIE root *okw- "to see").

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