Etymology
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fore (adv., prep.)
Old English fore (prep.) "before, in front of, in presence of; because of, for the sake of; earlier in time; instead of;" as an adverb, "before, previously, formerly, once," from Proto-Germanic *fura "before" (source also of Old Saxon fora, Old Frisian fara, Old High German fora, German vor, Danish for, Old Norse fyrr, Gothic faiura "for"), from PIE *prae-, extended form of root *per- (1) "forward," hence "in front of, before."

Now displaced by before. In nautical use, "toward the bows of the ship." Merged from 13c. with the abbreviated forms of afore and before and thus formerly often written 'fore. As a noun, "the front," from 1630s. The warning cry in golf is first recorded 1878, probably a contraction of before.
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fore (adj.)
mid-15c., "forward;" late 15c., "former, earlier;" early 16c., "situated at the front;" all senses apparently from fore- compounds, which frequently were written as two words in Middle English.
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fore- 
Middle English for-, fore-, from Old English fore-, often for- or foran-, from fore (adv. & prep.), which was used as a prefix in Old English as in other Germanic languages with a sense of "before in time, rank, position," etc., or designating the front part or earliest time.
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fore-ordain (v.)
also foreordain, "arrange or plan beforehand," late 14c., probably modeled on Latin praeordinare; see fore- + ordain (v.). A hybrid word.
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fore-and-aft (adj.)
nautical, "stem-to-stern," 1610s; see fore + aft. Especially of sails set on the lengthwise line of the vessel (1820), or of vessels so rigged.
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fore-mentioned (adj.)
also forementioned, 1580s; see fore- + mention (v.). A verb foremention is attested only from 1650s. Old English had foremearcod in this sense.
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foretaste (n.)
early 15c., from fore- + taste (n.). As a verb, from mid-15c.
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