Etymology
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forbid (v.)
Old English forbeodan "forbid, prohibit" (past tense forbead, plural forbudon, past participle forboden), from for- "against" + beodan "to command" (from PIE root *bheudh- "be aware, make aware"). Common Germanic compound (compare Old Frisian forbiada, Dutch verbieden, Old High German farbiotan, German verbieten, Old Norse fyrirbjoða, Swedish förbjuda, Gothic faurbiudan "to forbid").

In Middle English the past tense was forbad, the plural forbade, the past participle forbode. Related: Forbade; forbidden. Expression God forbid is recorded by early 13c. Forbidden fruit is from Genesis ii.17.
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forbidding (adj.)
1570s, "that forbids;" 1712 as "uninviting," present-participle adjective from forbid. Related: Forbiddingly; forbiddingness.
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verboten (adj.)
1912, German, "forbidden," from Old High German farbiotan "to forbid," cognate with forbid (q.v.).
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*bheudh- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "be aware, make aware."

It forms all or part of: beadle; bid; bo tree; bode; Bodhisattva; Buddha; forbid; foreboding; ombudsman; verboten.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit bodhati "is awake, is watchful, observes," buddhah "awakened, enlightened;" Old Church Slavonic bljudǫ  "to observe;" Lithuanian budėti "to be awake;" Old Irish buide "contentment, thanks;" Old English bodian "proclaim, announce; foretell," boda "messenger."

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nix (v.)
"cancel, refuse, forbid," 1903, from nix (n.). Related: Nixed; nixing.
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interdict (v.)
c. 1300, enterditen, "to place under ban of the Church, excommunicate," from Old French entredit (Modern French interdit), past participle of entredire "forbid by decree, excommunicate," from Latin interdicere "interpose by speech, prohibit, forbid," from inter "between" (see inter-) + dicere "to speak, to say" (from PIE root *deik- "to show," also "pronounce solemnly"). General sense "forbid, prohibit" in English is from early 15c. Related: Interdicted; interdicting; interdictory.
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veto (n.)
1620s, from Latin veto, literally "I forbid," first person singular present indicative of vetare "forbid, prohibit, oppose, hinder," of unknown origin. In ancient Rome, the "technical term for protest interposed by a tribune of the people against any measure of the Senate or of the magistrates" [Lewis].
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prohibitive (adj.)

early 15c., prohibitif, "having the quality of prohibiting, serving to forbid," from Medieval Latin prohibitivus, from prohibit-, past-participle stem of Latin prohibere "hold back, restrain, hinder, prevent" (see prohibit). Of prices, rates, etc., "so high as to prevent use," it is from 1886. Related: Prohibitively. Alternative prohibitory (1590s) is from Latin prohibitorius.

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prohibit (v.)

"forbid, interdict by authority," early 15c., prohibiten, from Latin prohibitus, past participle of prohibere "hold back, restrain, hinder, prevent," from pro "away, forth" (see pro-) + habere "to hold" (from PIE root *ghabh- "to give or receive"). For form, compare inhibit, exhibit. Related: Prohibited; prohibiting.

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