Etymology
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foolishness (n.)
late 15c., "quality of being foolish," from foolish + -ness. From 1530s as "a foolish practice."
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foolish (adj.)
early 14c., from fool (n.1) + -ish. Older adjectives in Middle English were fool (c. 1200); folly (c. 1300). Old English words for this were dysig, stunt, dol. Related: Foolishly; foolishness.
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hooey (n.)
"nonsense, foolishness," 1922, American English slang, of unknown origin.
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no-nonsense (adj.)

"not tolerating foolishness, practical," by 1912, from the phrase to stand no nonsense "tolerate no foolishness or extravagant conduct," which is attested from 1821, originally in sporting slang.

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fondness (n.)
late 14c., "foolishness," from fond + -ness.
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fatuity (n.)

1640s, from French fatuité (14c.), from Latin fatuitatem (nominative fatuitas) "foolishness, folly," from fatuus "foolish, insipid" (see fatuous).

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silliness (n.)
"foolishness," c. 1600, from silly + -ness; a reformation of seeliness, from Old English saelignes "happiness, (good) fortune, occurrence."
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madness (n.)

late 14c., "insanity, lunacy, dementia; rash or irrational conduct, headstrong passion, extreme folly," from mad (adj.) + -ness. Sense of "foolishness" is from early 15c.

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insipience (n.)
early 15c., "lack of wisdom, foolishness," from Old French insipience (15c.) or directly from Latin insipientia "folly, unwisdom," from insipientem "unwise, foolish" (see insipient).
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indiscretion (n.)
mid-14c., "want of discretion, imprudence," from Old French indiscrecion "foolishness, imprudence" (12c.), from Late Latin indiscretionem (nominative indiscretio) "lack of discernment," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + discretionem "discernment, power to make distinctions" (see discretion). Meaning "indiscreet act" is from c. 1600.
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