Etymology
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flourishing (adj.)
late 14c., "prospering, thriving;" c. 1400, "full of flowers," present-participle adjective from flourish (v.). Related: Flourishingly.
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flourish (v.)
c. 1300, "to blossom, grow" (intransitive), from Old French floriss-, stem of florir "to blossom, flower, bloom; prosper, flourish," from Latin florere "to bloom, blossom, flower," figuratively "to flourish, be prosperous," from flos "a flower" (from PIE root *bhel- (3) "to thrive, bloom"). Metaphoric sense of "thrive" is mid-14c. in English. Transitive meaning "brandish (a weapon), hold in the hand and wave about" is from late 14c. Related: Flourished; flourishing.
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blooming (adj.)
late 14c., "that is in flower, flourishing," present-participle adjective from bloom (v.). Meaning "full-blown" (often a euphemism for bloody) is attested from 1882.
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palmy (adj.)

"triumphant, flourishing," literally "worthy of the palm" (of victory or triumph), c. 1600, from palm (n.2) in the "triumph" sense + -y (2). The meaning "full of palms" attested from 1660s.

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florid (adj.)
1640s, "strikingly beautiful," from French floride "flourishing," from Latin floridus "flowery, in bloom," from flos "flower" (from PIE root *bhel- (3) "to thrive, bloom"). Sense of "ruddy" is first recorded 1640s. Meaning "highly decorated, profusely adorned (as with flowers)" is from 1650s. Related: Floridly.
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prosperity (n.)

"flourishing or thriving condition, good fortune, wealth, success in anything good or desirable," c. 1200, prosperite, from Old French prosprete (12c., Modern French prospérité) and directly from Latin prosperitatem (nominative prosperitas) "good fortune," from prosperus (see prosper).

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prosperous (adj.)

early 15c., "favorable, auspicious, tending to bring success;" late 15c., "flourishing, successful, making good progress in anything good or desirable;" from Anglo-French prosperous, prospereus, Anglo-Latin prosperosus, or directly from Old French prospereus (15c.), from prosperer, extended form of prospere, from Latin prosperus "favorable, fortunate" (see prosper). Related: Prosperously; prosperousness.

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renew (v.)

late 14c., reneuen, "make (something) like new, refurbish; begin (an activity) again; replenish, replace with a fresh supply; restore (a living thing) to a vigorous or flourishing state," also figurative, of spiritual states, souls, etc.; from re- "again" + Middle English newen, neuen "resume, revive, renew" (see new). A Latin-Germanic hybrid formed on analogy of Latin renovare. From early 15c. as "be restored, flourish once more." Related: Renewed; renewing.

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Letitia 
fem. proper name, literally "gladness," from Latin laetitia "joy, exultation, rejoicing, gladness, pleasure, delight," from laetus "glad, happy; flourishing, rich," a word of unknown origin. On the assumption that "fat, rich" is the older meaning, this word has been connected to lardus "bacon" and largus "generous," but de Vaan finds this "a very artificial reconstruction." In 17c. English had a verb letificate "make joyful" (1620s), and Middle English had letification "action of rejoicing" (late 15c.).
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revive (v.)

early 15c., reviven, "regain consciousness; recover health," also transitive, "restore (someone) to health, revive (someone or something)," from Old French revivre (10c.) and directly from Latin revivere "to live again," from re- "again" (see re-) + vivere "to live" (from PIE root *gwei- "to live").

The meaning "bring back to use or notice" is from mid-15c.; as "put an old play on stage again after a lapse of time" by 1823. The intransitive sense of "return to a flourishing state" is by 1560s. Of feelings, activities, "begin to occur again" (intransitive), mid-15c. Related: Revived; reviving.

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