Etymology
Advertisement
Florida 

U.S. state, formerly a Spanish colony, probably from Spanish Pascua florida, literally "flowering Easter," a Spanish name for Palm Sunday, and so named because the peninsula was discovered on that day (March 20, 1513) by the expedition of Spanish explorer Ponce de León. From Latin floridus "flowery, in bloom" (see florid). Related: Floridian (1580s as a noun, in reference to the natives; 1819 as an adjective).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Tampa 
city in Florida, U.S.A., probably from the name of a Calusa village, of unknown origin.
Related entries & more 
ridley 

type of sea-turtle, by 1942, from a common name of the animals in the Florida Keys, but the word is of unknown origin.

Related entries & more 
poisonwood (n.)

"small poisonous tree of the West Indies and southern Florida," 1721, from poison (n.) + wood (n.).

Related entries & more 
barracuda (n.)

large voracious fish of the West Indies and Florida, 1670s, barracoutha, from American Spanish barracuda, which is perhaps from a Carib word.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Tallahassee 
place in Florida, U.S.A., 1799, originally Seminole Tallahassee, from Muskogee /talaha:ssi/, name of a tribal town, perhaps from /(i)talwa/ "tribal town" + /ahassi/ "old, rancid."
Related entries & more 
Pensacola 

city on the Gulf coast of the Florida panhandle, named for a Muskogean tribe, from Choctaw, literally "hair-people," from pashi "hair of the head" + oklah "people."

Related entries & more 
savannah (n.)

also savanna, "treeless plain," 1550s, from Spanish sabana, earlier zavana "treeless plain," (Oviedo, 1535) from Taino (Arawakan) zabana. In U.S. use, especially in Florida, "a tract of low-lying marshy ground" (1670s). Savannah-grass is by 1756.

Related entries & more 
Miami 
place name in U.S.; the one in Florida is of unknown origin, attested in Spanish as Maymi (1566), Mayaimi (1575). The one in Ohio is from the Miami, native people there, attested from 18c., apparently from a native word /myaamiwa "downstream person."
Related entries & more 
hooter (n.)
by 1823, "anything that hoots," especially an owl, agent noun from hoot (v.). Slang meaning "nose" is from 1958. Meaning "a woman's breast" (usually in plural hooters) attested by 1972. The Hooters restaurant chain began 1983 in Clearwater, Florida, U.S.
Related entries & more