Advertisement
5 entries found.
Search filter: All Results 
flippant (adj.)
c. 1600, "talkative, nimble in talk;" 1670s, "displaying unbecoming levity," apparently an extended form of flip (v.). The ending is perhaps modeled on other adjectives in -ant or a relic of the Middle English present participle ending -inde. Shortened form flip is attested from 1847. Related: Flippantly.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
flip (adj.)
"talkative and disrespectfully smart," see flippant.
Related entries & more 
flippancy (n.)
1746, from flippant + abstract noun suffix -cy.
Related entries & more 
persiflage (n.)

"light, flippant banter; an ironical or frivolous treatment of a subject," 1757, from French persiflage, from persifler "to banter" (18c.), from Latin per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + French siffler "to whistle, hiss," from collateral form of Latin sibilare "to hiss," which possibly is of imitative origin. Said to have been introduced in English by Chesterfield.

Related entries & more 
airy (adj.)
late 14c., "of the air, containing air, made of air," from air (n.1) + -y (2). Meanings "breezy, exposed to the air, open to currents of air; lofty, high; light, buoyant; flimsy; flippant, jaunty, affectedly lofty; vain; unreal" all are attested by late 16c. From 1620s as "done in the air;" 1640s as "sprightly, light in movement;" 1660s as "visionary, speculative." Disparaging airy-fairy "unrealistic, fanciful" is attested from 1920 (earlier in a sense of "delicate or light as a fairy," which is how Tennyson used it in 1830).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement