Etymology
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flare (n.)
"a giving off of a bright, unsteady light," 1814, from flare (v.). This led to the sense of "signal fire" (1883). The astronomy sense is from 1937. Meaning "a gradual widening or spreading" is from 1910; hence flares "flared trousers" (1964).
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flare (v.)
1540s, "spread out" (hair), of unknown origin, perhaps from Scandinavian or from Dutch vlederen. Meaning "shine out with a sudden light" is from 1630s. The notion of "spreading out in display" is behind the notion of "spreading gradually outward" (1640s). Related: Flared; flaring.
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flare-up (n.)

"a sudden burst," 1827 of an argument; 1858 of light, from verbal phrase; see flare (v.) + up (adv.). It seems to have had some vogue as a street expression in London in the 1830s.

Flare up! flare up! is all the cry, in every square and street —
No other sound salutes your ear, whoe'er you chance to meet
Where'er you ride, or walk, or sit, or breakfast, dine, or sup,
They welcome you or quiz you with "Flare up, my boy! flare up!"
[Fraser's Magazine, April 1834]
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flatus (n.)
1660s, "wind in the bowels," from Latin flatus "a blowing," from flare "to blow" (from PIE root *bhle- "to blow").
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flatulent (adj.)

"affected by digestive gas," 1590s, from French flatulent (16c.), from Modern Latin flatulentus, from Latin flatus "a blowing, breathing, snorting; a breaking wind," past participle of flare "to blow, puff," from PIE root *bhle- "to blow."

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flageolet (n.)
flute-like instrument, 1650s, from French flageolet, diminutive of Old French flajol, from Provençal flajol, which is of uncertain origin, perhaps ultimately from Latin flare "to blow" (from PIE root *bhle- "to blow").
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souffle (n.)
light dish, sometimes savory but usually sweet, 1813, from French soufflé, noun use of past participle of souffler "to puff up," from Latin sufflare, from sub "under, up from under" (see sub-) + flare "to blow" (from PIE root *bhle- "to blow").
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afflatus (n.)
"miraculous communication of supernatural knowledge or power," 1660s, from Latin afflatus "a breathing upon, blast," figuratively "inspiration," noun use of past participle of afflare "to blow upon," from ad "to" (see ad-) + flare "to blow" (from PIE root *bhle- "to blow"). The literal meaning "a blowing or breathing upon" is rare in English, this sense being taken by afflation.
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conflation (n.)

mid-15c., "a harmony of the Gospels;" 1620s, "action of fusing together," from Late Latin conflationem (nominative conflatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin conflare "bring together, compose," also "melt together," literally "to blow together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + flare "to blow" (from PIE root *bhle- "to blow"). Meaning "inadvertent combination of two readings of the same passage" is from 1881.

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inflate (v.)
early 15c., "cause to swell," from Latin inflatus (source also of Italian enfiare, Spanish inflar, French enfler), past participle of inflare "blow into, puff up," figuratively "inspire, encourage," from in- "into" (from PIE root *en "in") + flare "to blow" (from PIE root *bhle- "to blow"). Economics sense (of prices, currency, etc.) is from 1843. In some senses a back-formation from inflation. Related: Inflated; inflating.
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