Etymology
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flabby (adj.)
1690s, regarded as a softened variant of flappy, which is recorded in the sense of "softly fleshy" from 1590s; see flap (n.). Related: Flabbily; flabbiness.
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flab (n.)
"fat, flabbiness," 1951, back-formation from flabby.
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flaccid (adj.)
1610s, from French flaccide or directly from Latin flaccidus "flabby, pendulous, weak, drooping," from flaccus "flabby, flap-eared," which is of uncertain origin (OED suggests it's imitative). Related: Flaccidly; flacidness; flaccidity; flaccescency.
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doughy (adj.)

"like dough," especially "flabby and pallid" or "yielding to pressure," c. 1600, from dough + -y (2). Related: Doughiness.

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quag (n.)

"marshy spot," 1580s, a variant of Middle English quabbe "a marsh, bog, shaking marshy soil," from Old English *cwabba "shake, tremble" (like something soft and flabby). Related: Quaggy.

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cushy (adj.)

"easy," 1915, Anglo-Indian slang, from Hindi khush "pleasant, healthy, happy" + -y (2). Wright's "English Dialect Dictionary" (1898) has cush "a soft, useless person," identified as Scottish and Northumberland and explained as "A common term of reproach, used of one who allows others to beat him, either in self-defence or at work," hence cushie "soft, flabby." 

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squab (n.)
1680s, "very young bird," earlier (1630s) "unformed, lumpish person" and used at various times for any sort of flabby mass, such as sofa cushions; probably from a Scandinavian word (compare dialectal Swedish skvabb "loose or fat flesh," skvabba "fat woman"), from Proto-Germanic *(s)kwab-. Klein lists cognates in Old Prussian gawabo "toad," Old Church Slavonic zaba "frog."
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flabbergast (v.)
1772, flabbergasted, mentioned (with bored) in a magazine article that year as a new vogue word, of uncertain origin. Perhaps from some dialect (in 1823 flabbergast was noted as a Sussex word), perhaps ultimately an arbitrary formation alluding to flabby or flapper and aghast. "Like many other popular words expressing intensity of action, ... not separable into definite elements or traceable to a definite origin" [Century Dictionary]. Related: Flabbergasted; flabbergasting; flabbergastation.
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lymphatic (adj.)
1640s, from Modern Latin lymphaticus "pertaining to the lymph," from Latin lympha (see lymph). The English word also sometimes is used in what was the primary sense of lymphaticus in classical Latin, "mad, frenzied." OED reports this meaning "difficult to account for," but perhaps due to association of lympha with nymphe; compare Greek nymphian "to be frenzy-stricken." Also sometimes in reference to the appearance or temperament of one thought to suffer from excess of lymph, "dull, sluggish, slow in thought or action, with flabby muscles and pale skin" (1834).
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bloat (v.)
1660s, "to cause to swell" (earlier, in reference to cured fish, "to cause to be soft," 1610s), from now obsolete bloat (adj.), attested from c. 1300 as "soft, flabby, flexible, pliable," but by 17c. meaning "puffed up, swollen." It is perhaps from a Scandinavian source akin to Old Norse blautr "soaked, soft from being cooked in liquid" (compare Swedish blöt fisk "soaked fish"), possibly from Proto-Germanic *blaut-, from PIE *bhleu- "to swell, well up," extended form of root *bhel- (2) "to blow, swell."

Influenced by or combined with Old English blawan "blow, puff." Figurative use by 1711. Intransitive meaning "to swell, to become swollen" is from 1735. Related: Bloated; bloating.
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