Etymology
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fix (n.)
"position from which it is difficult to move," 1809, American English, from fix (v.). Meaning "dose of narcotic" is from 1934, shortened from fix-up (1867, originally in reference to liquor). Meaning "reliable indication of the position of a ship, plane, etc." (by reference to fixed positions) is from 1902.
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fix (v.)

late 14c., "set (one's eyes or mind) on something" (a figurative use), probably from Old French verb *fixer, from fixe "fixed," from Latin fixus "fixed, fast, immovable; established, settled," past-participle adjective from figere "to fix, fasten, drive, thrust in; pierce through, transfix," also figurative, from PIE root *dheigw- "to pierce, stick in;" hence "to fix, fasten."

Sense of "fasten, attach" is c. 1400; that of "to make (colors, etc.) fast or permanent" is from 1660s. The meaning "settle, assign" evolved into "adjust, arrange" (1660s), then "to repair" (1737), but this sometimes was objected to (see below). Sense of "tamper with" (a fight, a jury, etc.) is from 1790. As euphemism for "castrate a pet" it dates from 1930. Related: Fixed; fixing.

To fix is to make fast, or permanent; to set immoveably, &c.: hence, to fix a watch, is to stop it, or prevent it from 'going;' which, it must be admitted, is a very unsatisfactory mode of repairing that article. [Seth T. Hurd, "A Grammatical Corrector; or, Vocabulary of the Common Errors of Speech," 1847]
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fixity (n.)
1660s in physics; general use from 1791; see fix (v.) + -ity.
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prix fixe 
meal served at a fixed price, 1883, French, literally "fixed price" (see price (n.) and fix (v.)).
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fixative (adj.)
1640s, from fix (v.) + -ative, suffix meaning "of or related to; tending to." As a noun, from 1870, "that which fixes."
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fixed (adj.)
late 14c., of stars, "unchangeable in position," past-participle adjective from fix (v.). Related: fixedly (1590s). Fixed-income (n.) is from 1767.
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fixings (n.)
"apparatus," 1820, American English, from fixing "act of putting in order" (c. 1600), verbal noun from fix (v.). American English sense of "food, garnishing" is attested from 1839.
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fixture (n.)
1590s, "act of fixing," perhaps from fix (v.) on model of mixture, or from an assumed Latin *fixitatem. Meaning "anything fixed or securely fastened" is from 1812, an alteration of fixure (c. 1600).
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fixer (n.)
1849, of chemicals, etc.; 1885 as a person who "makes things right;" agent noun from fix (v.). Fixer-upper is from 1967 as "that which repairs other things" (in an advertisement for a glue); by 1976 as a real-estate euphemism for "property that needs a lot of work."
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