Etymology
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fist (n.)

Old English fyst "fist, clenched hand," from West Germanic *fusti- (source also of Old Saxon fust, Old High German fust, Old Frisian fest, Middle Dutch vuust, Dutch vuist, German Faust), from Proto-Germanic *funhstiz, probably ultimately from a PIE "hand" word that is ultimately cognate with the root *penkwe- "five" (compare Old Church Slavonic pesti, Russian piasti "fist"), in reference to the five fingers.

Meaning "a blow with the fist" is from 1767. Fist-fight "duel with the fists" is from c. 1600. As a verb, Old English had fystlian "to strike with the fist."

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club-fist (n.)

1570s, "a large fist," hence, "a brutal fellow," from club (n.) + fist (n.). Related: Club-fisted.

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fistful (n.)
"as much as a fist will hold," 1610s, from fist (n.) + -ful.
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fistiana (n.)
"anecdotes of pugilists; boxing lore," 1839, from fist (n.) + -iana.
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fistic (adj.)
"relating to or done with the fists," 1806, from fist (n.) + -ic. Long considered improper English ("Not in dignified use" - OED).
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fisticuffs (n.)
c. 1600, fisty cuffes, from fist (n.) + cuff (n.) "a blow" (see cuff (v.2)), with the form perhaps in imitation of handiwork. Related: Fisticuff.
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foist (v.)
1540s, probably from Dutch vuisten "take in hand," from Middle Dutch vuist "fist" (see fist (n.)). Earliest sense was cheating at dice by concealing a loaded one in the palm of the hand with the intention of introducing it into play; general meaning "introduce surreptitiously, work in by a trick" is from 1560s. Related: Foisted; foisting.
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fistula (n.)

"long, narrow ulcer," late 14c., from Latin fistula "a pipe; ulcer," which is of uncertain origin. Related: Fistular; fistulous (Latin fistulosus "full of holes; tubular").

No certain etymology. The best comparison seems to be with festuca "stalk, straw" and maybe ferula "giant fennel" (if from *fesula): the forms of a "pipe" and a "stalk" are similar. The vacillation between fest- and fist- occurs within festuca itself, and might be dialectal, or allophonic within Latin. [de Vaan]
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pugilism (n.)

"the art or practice of fighting with the fists, gloved or not," 1789, from Latin pugil "boxer, fist-fighter," related to pugnus "fist" (from suffixed form of PIE root *peuk- "to prick") + -ism. Pugilation "fighting with fists," now obsolete, is recorded from 1650s.

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poniard (n.)

"a dagger or other short, stabbing weapon," 1580s, from French poinard (early 16c.), from Old French poignal "dagger," literally "anything grasped with the fist," from poing "fist," from Latin pungus "a fist" (from suffixed form of PIE root *peuk- "to prick"). Probably altered in French by association with poindre "to stab." Compare Latin pugnus "fist," pugio "dagger." As a verb from c. 1600, "to stab with or as if with a poniard."

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