Etymology
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fielder (n.)
early 14c., "one who works in a field," agent noun from field (n.). Sporting sense is from 1832 (in cricket; by 1868 in baseball). Earlier in cricket was simply field (1825) and fieldsman (1767).
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center-field (n.)

also centerfield, 1857 in baseball, from center (n.) + field (n.). Related: Center-fielder.

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bloop (v.)
1926, a word from the early days of radio (see blooper). In baseball, "hit a ball in a high arc over the head of a fielder," by 1940. Related: Blooped; blooping. As a noun from 1931.
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blooper (n.)
"blunder," 1943, apparently first in theater, from American English baseball slang meaning "a fly ball in a high arc missed by the fielder" (1937) or else from the earlier sense "radio receiver that interferes with nearby sets" when a careless operator throws it into oscillation (1926), in which case it imitates the resulting sound (compare bloop).
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mitt (n.)

1765, shortened form of mitten (q.v.) in the fashionable sense of "glove without fingers or with very short fingers of black lace or knitted silk, worn by women." In the more general sense of "glove without a separate covering for each finger" by 1812. Baseball sense of "protective glove for a pitcher, catcher, or fielder" is from 1902. Slang sense of "hand" is from 1896. Slang mitt-reader for "fortune teller" is by 1928.

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