Etymology
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fictional (adj.)
"pertaining to fiction," 1833, from fiction + -al (1). Earlier fictitious also was used in this sense (1773).
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fictionalize (v.)
1911, from fictional + -ize. Related: Fictionalized; fictionalizing. Earlier was fictionize (1822).
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kryptonite (n.)
fictional substance in the "Superman" series, where it weakens the otherwise invulnerable hero, 1943; perhaps from elements of krypton (which is a gas) + meteorite.
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Robinson Crusoe 
"man without companionship," 1768, from the eponymous hero of Daniel Defoe's fictional shipwreck narrative (1719).
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Holmesian (adj.)
1911, in reference to fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, who debuted in 1887. Sherlock-Holmes-ian is from 1902.
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Peck's bad boy 

"unruly or mischievous child," 1883, from fictional character created by George Wilbur Peck (1840-1916).

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faction (n.2)
"fictional narrative based on real characters or events, 1967, a blend of fact and fiction.
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hoser (n.)
"contemptible person," also hose-head, by 1982, a term popularized by the Canadian parody comic sketch "Great White North" with the fictional McKenzie Brothers on SCTV.
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Angria 
name of a fictional empire, placed in Africa, imagined by the Brontë children, who wrote tales of it before they wrote the novels that made the three women famous. Related: Angrian.
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borg (n.)
fictional hostile alien hive-race in the "Star Trek" series, noted for "assimilating" defeated rivals, first introduced in "The Next Generation" TV series (debut fall 1987). Their catchphrase is "resistance is futile." According to the series creators, the name is derived from cyborg.
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