Etymology
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fib (v.)
"tell trifling lies," 1680s, from fib (n.). Seldom, if ever, transitive. Related: Fibbed; fibbing; fibbery.
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fib (n.)
"a lie," especially a little one, "a white lie," 1610s, of uncertain origin, perhaps from fibble-fable "nonsense" (1580s), a reduplication of fable (n.).
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fibber (n.)
1723, agent noun from fib (v.).
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fibrous (adj.)
"consisting of, or having the characteristics of, fibers," 1620s, from Modern Latin fibrosus, from Latin fibra "a fiber, filament" (see fiber).
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fibromyalgia (n.)
1981, said to have been coined by U.S. rheumatologist Mohammed Yunus, from Latin fibra "a fiber, filament" (see fiber) + Greek mys (genitive myos) "muscle" (see muscle (n.)) + -algia "pain." The earlier name for the condition was fibrositis.
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fibrillation (n.)
1842, "state of being fibrillar" (that is, "arranged in fibrils"), noun of action from fibrillate (v.). Especially "a quavering in the fibrils of the muscles of the heart" causing irregular beating (1882).
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fibrillar (adj.)
"pertaining to or of the nature of fibrillae," 1847, from fibrilla (see fibril) + -ar.
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fibre (n.)
chiefly British English spelling of fiber (q.v.); for spelling, see -re.
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fibril (n.)
1680s, Englishing of Modern Latin fibrilla "a little fiber, a filament," especially in botany, diminutive of Latin fibra "a fiber, filament" (see fiber). Latin fibra and fibrilla were used in 17c. physiology in English alongside nativized fibre and fibril. From 1931 as "thread-like molecular formation."
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