Etymology
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fed (adj.)
past-participle adjective from feed (v.). Fed up "surfeited, disgusted, bored," is British slang first recorded 1900 (some early uses connect it to the Boer War), extended to U.S. by World War I; probably from earlier phrases like fed up to the back teeth. Earlier it was used of livestock, "fatten up by feeding." The notion probably is the same one in to have had enough "to have had too much."
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fed (n.)
1788, short for Federalist; as colloquial for "official of the federal government," from 1916; especially, since 1930s, of FBI agents.
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overfed (adj.)

"fed too much, fed to excess," 1570s, from over- + fed (adj.).

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well-fed (adj.)
mid-14c., from well (adv.) + past participle of feed (v.).
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swill (n.)
"liquid kitchen refuse fed to pigs," 1550s, from swill (v.).
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pampered (adj.)

1520s, "over-fed," past-participle adjective from pamper. Meaning "spoiled by luxury" is from 1690s. Related: Pamperedness.

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in-patient (n.)
also inpatient, "person lodged and fed, as well as treated, at a hospital or infirmary," 1760, from in (adj.) + patient (n.). As an adjective by 1890.
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spoon-feed (v.)
"to feed (someone) with a spoon," 1610s, from spoon (n.) + feed (v.). Figurative sense is attested by 1864. Related: Spoon-fed.
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force-feed (v.)
by 1905 in animal husbandry, from force (n.) + feed (v.). Related: Force-fed; force-feeding. Force-feeding (n.) is from 1900.
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hogwash (n.)
mid-15c., hogges wash, "kitchen slops fed to pigs, refuse of a kitchen or brewery," from hog (n.) + wash (n.). Extended to "cheap liquor" (1712) then to "inferior writing" (1773).
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