Etymology
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favor (n.)
c. 1300, "attractiveness, beauty, charm" (archaic), from Old French favor "a favor; approval, praise; applause; partiality" (13c., Modern French faveur), from Latin favorem (nominative favor) "good will, inclination, partiality, support," coined by Cicero from stem of favere "to show kindness to," from PIE *ghow-e- "to honor, revere, worship" (cognate: Old Norse ga "to heed").

Meaning "good will, kind regard" is from mid-14c. in English; sense of "act of kindness, a kindness done" is from late 14c. Meaning "bias, partiality" is from late 14c. Meaning "thing given as a mark of favor" is from late 15c. Phrase in favor of recorded from 1560s.
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favor (v.)
mid-14c., "to regard with favor, indulge, treat with partiality," from Old French favorer, from favor "a favor, partiality" (see favor (n.)). Meaning "to resemble, look somewhat like" is from c. 1600. Related: Favored; favoring.
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favour 
chiefly British English spelling of favor (q.v.); for spelling, see -or. Related: Favourite; favouritism.
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favored (adj.)

1725, "enjoying unusual advantages," past-participle adjective from favor (v.). In compounds or phrases, "-featured, -looking," from c. 1400 (for example, well-favored "good-looking;" worst-favored "ugliest").

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favorable (adj.)
late 14c., "kind, friendly," from Old French favorable "well-disposed, favorable, partial," from Latin favorabilis "favored, in favor," from favor "good will, partiality" (see favor (n.)). Meaning "advantageous" is from mid-15c. In Middle English it also meant "attractive, pleasing, agreeable." Related: Favorably.
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disfavor (n.)

1530s "unfavorable regard, slight displeasure;" 1580s, "state of being regarded unfavorably;" see dis- "the opposite of" + favor (n.). As a verb, "withdraw or withhold favor or support," from 1560s. Related: Disfavored; disfavoring.

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Favonius 

personification of the west wind in Roman mythology, from Latin Favonius, which de Vaan suggests is cognate with the god-name Faunus (see faun), from a prehistoric noun meaning "who favors" (see favor (n.)):

This also yields a good semantic motivation: the wind that stimulates vegetation can be called favourable. Favonius was regarded by the Romans as the herald of spring and the start of new vegetation (e.g. Cato Agr. 50.1, Cicero Ver. 5.27, Lucretius 1.11, Vitruvius 2.9.1).

The Latin word is the source (via Old High German phonno, 10c., via Vulgar Latin contraction *faonius) of German Föhn "warm, dry wind blowing down Alpine valleys." Related: Favonian.

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favorite (n.)

"person or thing regarded with especial liking," 1580s, from French favorit, perhaps via Italian favorito, noun use of past participle of favorire, from favore, from Latin favorem "inclination, partiality, support" (see favor (n.)).

Especially, "a person who gains dominant influence over a superior" (1590s). In racing, "one considered most likely to win," attested from 1813. In 17c.-18c. also "small curl hanging loose upon the temple," a frequent feature of a woman's head dress. 

As an adjective, "regarded with particular liking, esteem, or preference," by 1711. Favorite son in the figurative sense "noted man who is particularly popular and boasted of in his native area" is by 1788.

As a corresponding noun in the sense of "person who promotes the interests of another," Latin had fautor, hence Old French fauteur, Middle English fautour "an adherent, supporter, follower" (mid-14c.), but it has perished along with its fem. form, fautress.

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gawk (v.)
"stare stupidly," 1785, American English, of uncertain origin. Perhaps [Watkins] from gaw, a survival from Middle English gowen "to stare" (c. 1200), from a Scandinavian source akin to Old Norse ga "to heed," from Proto-Germanic *gawon, from PIE *ghow-e- "to honor, revere, worship" (see favor (n.)); and altered perhaps by gawk hand (see gawky). Liberman finds this untenable and writes that its history is entangled with that of gowk "cuckoo," which is from Scandinavian, but it need not be from that word, either. Nor is French gauche (itself probably from Germanic) considered a likely source. "It is possibly another independent imitative formation with the structure g-k" (compare geek). From 1867 as a noun. Related: Gawked; gawking.
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favoritism (n.)

"disposition to favor one person or family or one class of persons to the neglect of others having equal claims," 1763, from favorite + -ism.

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