Etymology
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faux pas (n.)
"breach of good manners, any act that compromises one's reputation," 1670s, French, literally "false step." See false and pace (n.).
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pas (n.)

"a step in dancing," a French word in English, 1775, from French pas "a step, track, passage," from Latin passus "step, pace" (from PIE root *pete- "to spread"). Used in forming names for types of dances, such as pas de deux "dance for two persons" (1762).

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faux (adj.)
from French faux "false" (12c., see false). Used with English words at least since 1676 (Etheredge, faux-prude). Used by itself, with French pronunciation, from 1980s to mean "fake."
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pas devant les enfants 
French: "Not in front of the children."
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misstep (v.)

also mis-step, c. 1300, missteppen, "make a false step, stumble," from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + step (v.). Figurative sense by c. 1500. The noun in the figurative sense of "faux pas" is recorded by c. 1800; the literal sense "a false step, a stumble" is by 1837.

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false (adj.)

late Old English, "intentionally untrue, lying," of religion, "not of the true faith, not in accord with Christian doctrines," from Old French fals, faus "false, fake; incorrect, mistaken; treacherous, deceitful" (12c., Modern French faux), from Latin falsus "deceptive, feigned, deceitful, pretend," also "deceived, erroneous, mistaken," past participle of fallere "deceive, disappoint," which is of uncertain origin (see fail (v.)).

Adopted into other Germanic languages (cognates: German falsch, Dutch valsch, Old Frisian falsk, Danish falsk), though English is the only one in which the active sense of "deceitful" (a secondary sense in Latin) has predominated. From c. 1200 as "deceitful, disloyal, treacherous; not genuine;" from early 14c. as "contrary to fact or reason, erroneous, wrong." False alarm recorded from 1570s. False step (1700) translates French faux pas. To bear false witness is attested from mid-13c. False prophet "one who prophecies without divine commission or by evil spirits," is attested from late 13c.

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ardurous (adj.)

"full of ardor," 1770, perhaps a variant of arduous with overtones of ardor. Useful only to poets, and, as it is first attested in Chatterton, perhaps a faux medievalism.

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zydeco (n.)
1949, perhaps from Creole French pronunciation of French les haricots "the beans," part of the title of a popular dance tune ("les haricots sont pas salés").
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jete (n.)
ballet step, 1830, from French (pas) jeté, from past participle of jeter "to throw" (see jet (v.1)).
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pass (n.1)
"mountain defile," c. 1300, from Old French pas "step, track, passage," from Latin passus "step, pace" (from PIE root *pete- "to spread").
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