Etymology
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fatigue (n.)
1660s, "that which causes weariness," from French fatigue "weariness," from fatiguer "to tire" (15c.), from Latin fatigare "to weary, to tire out," originally "to cause to break down," from pre-Latin adjective *fati-agos "driving to the point of breakdown," with first half from Old Latin *fatis, which is of unknown origin but apparently related to affatim (adv.) "sufficiently" and to fatisci "crack, split." The second half is the root of agere "to set in motion, drive; to do, perform" (from PIE root *ag- "to drive, draw out or forth, move").

Especially "the labors of military persons" (1776). Meaning "a feeling of weariness from exertion" is from 1719. Of metals or other materials under strain, from 1877.
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fatigue (v.)
1690s, from French fatiguer "to tire" (15c.), from fatigue (see fatigue (n.)). Earlier in same sense was fatigate (1530s), from Latin fatigatus, past participle of fatigare. Related: Fatigued; fatiguing; fatigation (c. 1500).
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fatigues (n.)
1776, "extra duties of a soldier," from fatigue (n.). As a military clothing outfit, from 1836, short for fatigue dress (1833); fatigue cap is from 1824.
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infatigable (adj.)
"untiring," c. 1500, from French infatigable (15c.) or directly from Late Latin infatigabilis "that cannot be wearied," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + fatigabilis "that may be wearied," from Latin fatigare "to weary" (see fatigue (n.)).
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defatigable (adj.)
Origin and meaning of defatigable

"liable to be wearied," 1650s, from defatigate (v.), 1550s, from Latin defatigatus, past participle of defatigare "to weary, tire out, exhaust with labor," from de "utterly, down, away" (see de-) + fatigare "to weary" (see fatigue (n.)). Also see indefatigable.

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indefatigable (adj.)

1580s (implied in indefatigably), from French indefatigable (15c.), from Latin indefatigabilis "that cannot be wearied," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + defatigare "to tire out," from de- "utterly, down, away" (see de-) + fatigare "to weary" (see fatigue (n.)).

Blount's "Glossographia" (1656) has defatigable, which also was in use elsewhere in 17c., but the modern use of defatigable (1948) probably is a jocular back-formation from indefatigable.

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ashram (n.)
"religious hermitage," 1900, from Sanskrit asramah, from a-, adnomial prefix (from PIE adverbial particle ē), + sramah "effort, toll, fatigue."
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punchy (adj.1)
"nervously anxious; irritable from fatigue," 1937, from punch (v.) + -y (2). Perhaps originally a shortening of punch-drunk. Related: Punchily; punchiness.
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overtire (v.)

1550s, "to tire excessively, fatigue to exhaustion" (trans.), from over- + tire (v.). Intransitive sense of "become excessively fatigued" is by 1630s. Related: Overtired; overtiring.

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exanimate (adj.)

"inanimate, lifeless," 1530s, from Latin exanimatus "lifeless, dead," past participle of exanimare "to deprive of air or breath; tire, fatigue; to deprive of life; to terrify," from ex "out" (see ex-) + animare "give breath to" (see animate (v.)). Related: Exanimation.

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