Etymology
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fashion (n.)

c. 1300, fasoun, "physical make-up or composition; form, shape; appearance," from Old French façon, fachon, fazon "face, appearance; construction, pattern, design; thing done; beauty; manner, characteristic feature" (12c.), from Latin factionem (nominative factio) "a making or doing, a preparing," also "group of people acting together," from facere "to make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").

Especially "style, manner" of make, dress, or embellishment (late 14c.); hence "prevailing custom; mode of dress and adornment prevailing in a place and time" (late 15c.). Meaning "good style, conformity to fashionable society's tastes" is from 1630s.

To call a fashion wearable is the kiss of death. No new fashion worth its salt is wearable. [Eugenia Sheppard, New York Herald Tribune, Jan. 13, 1960]

In Middle English also spelled faschyoun, facune, faction, etc. Fashion plate (1851) originally was "full-page picture in a popular magazine showing the prevailing or latest style of dress," in reference to the typographic plate from which it was printed. Transferred sense of "well-dressed person" had emerged by 1920s. After a fashion "to a certain extent" is from 1530s. Shakespeare (c. 1600) has both in fashion and out of fashion.

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fashion (v.)
"to form, give shape to," early 15c.; see fashion (n.). Related: Fashioned; fashioning.
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fashionista (n.)

by 1993, from fashion + -ista (see -ist). In the same sense were fashionist ("obsequious follower of modes and fashions," 1610s, alive as late as 1850); fashion-monger (1590s); fashion-fly (1868).

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refashion (v.)

"form or mold into shape anew or a second time," 1788 (implied in refashioned), from re- + fashion (v.). Related: Refashioning; refashionment.

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fashionable (adj.)

c. 1600, "capable of being fashioned," also "conforming to prevailing tastes," from fashion + -able. From 1620s as "stylish;" as a noun, "person of fashion," from 1800. Related: Fashionably "in a manner accordant with fashion, custom, or prevailing practice; with modish elegance;" fashionably late is by 1809.

She was somewhat surprised, especially as she came fashionably late, to find in the drawing-room only old Mrs. Wynne, her nephew, and a lady, who from her dress and modest appearance was evidently nobody. [Maria Edgworth, "Tales of Fashionable Life," 1809]
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old-fashioned (adj.)

1650s, "in an outdated style, formed in a fashion that has become obsolete," from old + past participle of fashion (v.). Meaning "partaking of the old ways, suited to the tastes of former times" is from 1680s. Related: Old-fashionedness. New-fashioned is recorded from 1610s.

As a type of cocktail, Old Fashioned is attested by 1901, American English, short for a fuller name.

Old Fashioned Tom Gin Cocktail Mix same as Holland Gin Old Fashioned Cocktail using Old Tom gin in place of Holland [George J. Kappeler, "Modern American Drinks," Akron, Ohio, 1900]

(Old Tom (1821) was a name for a strong variety of English gin.)

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chine (adj.)

"in Chinese fashion," French chiné, past participle of chiner "to color in Chinese fashion," from Chine "China" (see China).

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remodel (v.)

also re-model, "to mold, shape, or fashion anew," 1789, from re- "back, again" + model (v.) "fashion, construct." Related: Remodeled; remodeling.

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mode (n.2)

"current fashion, prevailing style," 1640s, from French mode "manner, fashion, style" (15c.), a specialized use of the French word that also yielded mode (n.1).

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vogue (n.)

1570s, the vogue, "height of popularity or accepted fashion," from French vogue "fashion, success;" also "drift, swaying motion (of a boat)" literally "a rowing," from Old French voguer "to row, sway, set sail" (15c.), probably from a Germanic source. Compare Old High German wagon "to float, fluctuate," literally "to balance oneself;" German Woge "wave, billow," wogen "fluctuate, float" (from PIE root *wegh- "to go, move").

Perhaps the notion is of being "borne along on the waves of fashion." Italian voga "a rowing," Spanish boga "rowing," but colloquially "fashion, reputation" also probably are from the same Germanic source. Phrase in vogue "having a prominent place in popular fashion" first recorded 1643. The fashion magazine began publication in 1892.

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