Etymology
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fare (n.)
Old English fær "journey, road, passage, expedition," from strong neuter of faran "to journey" (see fare (v.)); merged with faru "journey, expedition, companions, baggage," strong fem. of faran. Original sense is obsolete, except in compounds (wayfarer, sea-faring, etc.) Meaning "food provided" is c. 1200 (Old English also had the word in the sense "means of subsistence"); that of "conveyance" appears in Scottish early 15c. and led to sense of "payment for passage" (1510s). Meaning "person conveyed in a vehicle" is from 1560s.
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fare (v.)

Old English faran "to journey, set forth, go, travel, wander, make one's way," also "be, happen, exist; be in a particular condition," from Proto-Germanic *faranan "to go" (source also of Old Saxon, Old High German, Gothic faran, Old Norse and Old Frisian fara, Dutch varen, German fahren), from PIE *por- "going, passage," from root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over." Related: Fared; faring.

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warfare (n.)
mid-15c., from war (n.) + fare (see fare (n.)).
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wayfaring (n.)
14c., modification of Old English wegfarende "wayfaring;" see way (n.) + fare (v.).
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seafaring (adj.)
c. 1200, from sea + faring (see fare (v.)).
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thoroughfare (n.)
late 14c., "passage or way through," from thorough (before it had differentiated from through) + fare (n.).
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elver (n.)
"young eel," 1640s, variant or corruption of eelfare (1530s), literally "passage of young eels up a river;" see eel + fare (n.).
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wayfarer (n.)
mid-15c., agent noun from way (n.) + fare (v.). Earlier was wayferer (late 14c.). The brand of sunglasses (manufactured by Ray-Ban) dates to 1952.
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seafarer (n.)
1510s, from sea + agent noun from fare (n.). The Anglo-Saxon poem known by this name at least since 1842 was untitled in original MS.
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fartlek (n.)
1952, Swedish, from fart "speed" (cognate with Old Norse fara "to go, move;" see fare (v.)) + lek "play" (cognate with Old Norse leika "play;" see lark (v.)).
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