Etymology
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fancy (n.)
mid-15c., fantsy "inclination, liking," contraction of fantasy. It took the older and longer word's sense of "inclination, whim, desire." Meaning "the productive imagination" is from 1580s. That of "a fanciful image or conception" is from 1660s. Meaning "fans of an amusement or sport, collectively" is attested by 1735, especially (though not originally) of the prize ring. The adjective is recorded from 1751 in the sense "fine, elegant, ornamental" (opposed to plain); later as "involving fancy, of a fanciful nature" (1800). Fancy man attested by 1811.
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fancy (v.)
"take a liking to," 1540s, a contraction of fantasien "to fantasize (about)," from fantasy (n.). Meaning "imagine" is from 1550s. Related: Fancied; fancies; fancying. Colloquial use in fancy that, etc. is recorded by 1813.
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fancy-free (adj.)
"free from the trammels of love, having the 'fancy' or affection free," 1580s, from fancy (n.) + free (adj.).
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fancied (adj.)
"imaginary, formed by the fancy," 1560s, past-participle adjective from fancy (v.).
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fanciful (adj.)
1620s, from fancy (n.) + -ful. Related: Fancifully.
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fancier (n.)
"one with a special taste or aptitude (for something)," 1765, agent noun from fancy (v.).
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fan (n.2)

"devotee," 1889, American English, originally of baseball enthusiasts, probably a shortening of fanatic, but it may be influenced by the fancy, a collective term for followers of a certain hobby or sport (especially boxing); see fancy (n.). There is an isolated use from 1682, but the modern word likely is a late 19c. formation. Fan mail attested from 1920, in a Hollywood context; Fan club attested by 1930.

Before the close of the republic, an enthusiastic partisan of one of the factions in the chariot races flung himself upon the pile on which the body of a favourite coachman was consumed, and perished in the flames. [Lecky, "European Morals"]
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humor (v.)
1580s, "comply with (someone's) fancy or disposition;" see humor (n.). Related: Humored; humoring.
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pigeon-wing (n.)

1807 as the name of a brisk, fancy step in dancing, skating, etc.; see pigeon + wing (n.).

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fangled (adj.)
1580s, "new-made," with implications of "foppish," from fangle (n.) "a new fancy, a novelty," based on newfangle "fond of novelty" (see newfangled).
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