Etymology
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facile princeps 
Latin, literally "easily first." An acknowledged leader or chief. See facile, prince.
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facilis descensus Averni 
Latin, literally "the descent of Avernus (is) easy" ["Aeneid," VI.126], in reference to Avernus, a deep lake near Puteoli and a reputed entrance to the underworld; hence, "it is easy to slip into moral ruin."
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fait accompli (n.)
"a scheme already carried into execution," 19c., French, literally "an accomplished fact." See feat and accomplish.
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Fannie Mae (n.)
1948, from FNMA, acronym of "Federal National Mortgage Association," established 1938.
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fast and loose 
described as "a cheating game played with a stick and a belt or string, so arranged that a spectator would think he could make the latter fast by placing a stick through its intricate folds, whereas the operator could detach it at once." [James O. Halliwell, "Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words," 1847]. The figurative sense (1550s) is recorded earlier than the literal (1570s).
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Father's Day 
1910, begun in Spokane, Washington, U.S., but not widespread until 1940s; an imitation of Mother's Day.
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faux pas (n.)
"breach of good manners, any act that compromises one's reputation," 1670s, French, literally "false step." See false and pace (n.).
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feme covert (n.)

"married woman" (legalese), c. 1600, French, from Old French feme coverte, second element fem. of covert "covered" (see covert). Contrasted to feme sole. Also compare coverture.

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femme fatale (n.)

"attractive and dangerous woman," 1895, from French femme fatale, attested by 1844, from French femme "woman," from Latin femina "woman, a female" (see feminine) + fatale (see fatal).

Une femme fatale est une femme qui porte malheur. [Jules Claretie, "La Vie a Paris," 1896]

Earlier, such a woman might be called a Circe.

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feng shui (n.)
also feng-shui, fung-shui, 1797, from Chinese, from feng "wind" + shui "water." A system of spiritual influences in natural landscapes and a means of regulating them; "A kind of geomancy practiced by the Chinese for determining the luckiness or unluckiness of sites for graves, houses, cities, etc." [Century Dictionary].
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