Etymology
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face-painting (n.)
1706, "portrait-painting," from face (n.) + painting (n.). In reference to applying color to the face, by 1778. Related: Face-painter; face-paint.
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face-plate (n.)
"protective cover, shield," 1874, from face (n.) + plate (n.).
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facet (n.)
1620s, "one side of a multi-sided body," from French facette (12c., Old French facete), diminutive of face "face, appearance" (see face (n.)). The diamond-cutting sense is the original one. Transferred and figurative use by 1820. Related: Faceted; facets.
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facetious (adj.)
1590s, from French facétieux (16c.), from facétie "a joke" (15c.), from Latin facetiae "jests, witticisms" (singular facetia), from facetus "witty, elegant, fine, courteous," which is of unknown origin, perhaps related to facis "torch."

Formerly often in a good sense, "witty, amusing," but later implying a desire to be amusing that is often intrusive or ill-timed. Related: Facetiously; facetiousness. "Facetiæ in booksellers' catalogues, is, like curious, a euphemism for erotica." [Fowler]
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face-value (n.)
1842, from face (n.) + value (n.). Originally of stock shares, banknotes, etc.
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facial (adj.)
c. 1600, "face to face," from French facial, from Medieval Latin facialis "of the face," from facies (see face (n.)). Meaning "pertaining to the face" in English is from 1786. The noun meaning "beauty treatment for the face" is from 1914, American English. Middle English had faciale (n.) "face-cloth for a corpse" (early 14c.).
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-facient 
word-forming element meaning "a doer, one who or that which does," from Latin -facientem (nominative -faciens), combining form of present participle of facere "to make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").
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facile (adj.)

late 15c., "easy to do," from French facile "easy," from Latin facilis "easy to do," of persons, "pliant, courteous, yielding," from facere "to do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Usually now with depreciatory implication. Of persons, "easily led," from 1510s.

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facile princeps 
Latin, literally "easily first." An acknowledged leader or chief. See facile, prince.
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