Etymology
Advertisement
farm-house (n.)
also farmhouse, "principal dwelling-house of a farm," 1590s, from farm (n.) + house (n.).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
farming (n.)
1590s, "action of farming out, practice of letting or leasing taxes, etc., for collection," verbal noun from farm (v.). Meaning "business of cultivating land, husbandry" is attested by 1733.
Related entries & more 
farmstead (n.)
"collection of buildings belonging to a farm," 1785, from farm (n.) + stead (n.).
Related entries & more 
faro (n.)
18th century gambling game with cards, 1726, sometimes said to be altered from pharaoh, perhaps his image was on one of the cards, but early descriptions of the game give no indication of this and it seems to have been played with a standard deck.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Faroese (n.)
also Faeroese, 1816, from the Faroe islands, at the ends of the North Sea, literally "sheep-islands," from Faroese Føroyar, from før "sheep" + oy (plural oyar) "island."
Related entries & more 
far-off (adj.)
also faroff, "distant, remote," 1590s, from adverbial phrase, from far (adv.) + off (adv.).
Related entries & more 
far-out (adj.)
also far out, 1887, "remote, distant;" from adverbial phrase, from far (adv.) + out (adv.). Slang sense of "excellent, wonderful," is from 1954, originally in jazz talk.
Related entries & more 
Farquhar 
surname attested from late 12c., from Gaelic fearchar "very dear one."
Related entries & more 
farrago (n.)

"hodgepodge, a confused mix," 1630s, from Latin farrago "medley, mixed fodder, mix of grains for animal feed," from far "grain" (see farina).

Related entries & more 

Page 24